A Brief History of the English Reformation

Author: Derek Wilson
Publisher: Robinson
ISBN: 1849018251
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Religion, politics and fear: how England was transformed by the Tudors. The English Reformation was a unique turning point in English history. Derek Wilson retells the story of how the Tudor monarchs transformed English religion and why it still matters today. Recent scholarly research has undermined the traditional view of the Reformation as an event that occurred solely amongst the elite. Wilson now shows that, although the transformation was political and had a huge impact on English identity, on England's relationships with its European neighbours and on the foundations of its empire, it was essentially a revolution from the ground up. By 1600, in just eighty years, England had become a radically different nation in which family, work and politics, as well as religion, were dramatically altered. Praise for Derek Wilson: 'Stimulating and authoritative.' John Guy. 'Masterly. [Wilson] has a deep understanding of . . . characters, reaching out across the centuries.' Sunday Times.

The Reformation

Author: Kenneth G. Appold
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444397680
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Reformation: A Brief History is a succinct and engaging introduction to the origins and history of the Protestant Reformation. A rich overview of the Reformation, skillfully blending social, political, religious and theological dimensions A clearly and engagingly written narrative which draws on the latest and best scholarship Includes the history of the Reformation in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, areas that are rarely covered in any detail The Reformation is placed in the context of the entire history of Christianity to draw out its origins, impetus, and legacy

The Reformation

Author: Kenneth G. Appold
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405117494
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Reformation: A Brief History is a succinct and engaging introduction to the origins and history of the Protestant Reformation. A rich overview of the Reformation, skillfully blending social, political, religious and theological dimensions A clearly and engagingly written narrative which draws on the latest and best scholarship Includes the history of the Reformation in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, areas that are rarely covered in any detail The Reformation is placed in the context of the entire history of Christianity to draw out its origins, impetus, and legacy

A Brief History of Henry VIII

Author: Derek Wilson
Publisher: Robinson
ISBN: 1472107632
Format: PDF
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Henry VIII changed the course of English life more completely than any monarch since the Conquest. In the portraits of Holbein, Henry Tudor stands proud as one of the most powerful figures in renaissance Europe. But is the portrait just a bluff? In his new book Derek Wilson explores the myths behind the image of the Tudor Lion. He was the monarch that delivered the Reformation to England yet Luther called him 'A fool, a liar and a damnable rotten worm'. As a young man he gained a reputation as an intellectual and fair prince yet he ruled the nation like a tyrant. He treated his subjects as cruelly as he treated his wives. Based on a wealth of new material and a life time's knowledge of the subject Derek Wilson exposes a new portrait of a much misunderstood King. PRAISE FOR DEREK WILSON'S PREVIOUS WORKS: The Uncrowned Kings of England: 'Stimulating and authorative.' John Guy 'Masterly. [Wilson] has a deep understanding of...characters, reaching out accross the centuries.' Sunday Times Hans Holbein: Portrait of an Unknown Man: 'Fascinating.' Sarah Bradford, Daily Telegraph' Highly readable...The most accurate and vivid portrayal to date.' Alison Weir

Five Women of the English Reformation

Author: Paul F. M. Zahl
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802830455
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Books on the history of the Reformation are filled with the heroic struggles and sacrifices of men. But this compelling volume puts the spotlight on five strong and intellectually gifted women who, because of their absolute and unconditional commitment to the advancement of Protestant Christianity, paid the cost of their reforming convictions with martyrdom, imprisonment, and exile. Anne Boleyn (1507-1536) introduced the Reformation to England, and Katharine Parr (1514-1548) saved it. Both women were riveted by early versions of the "justification by faith" doctrine that originated with Martin Luther and came to them through France. As a result, Anne Boleyn was beheaded. Katharine Parr narrowly avoided the same fate. Sixteen-year-old Jane Grey (1537-1554) and Anne Askew (1521-1546) both dared to criticize the Mass and were pioneers of Protestant views concerning superstition and symbols. Jane Grey was executed because of her Protestantism. Anne Askew was tortured and burned at the stake. Catherine Willoughby (1520-1580) anticipated later Puritan teachings on predestination and election and on the reformation of the church. She was forced to give up everything she had and to flee with her husband and nursing baby into exile. Paul Zahl vividly tells the stories of these five mothers of the English Reformation. All of these women were powerful theologians intensely interested in the religious concerns of their day. All but Anne Boleyn left behind a considerable body of written work - some of which is found in this book's appendices. It is the theological aspect of these women's remarkable achievements that Zahl seeks to underscore. Moreover, he also considers what the stories of these women have to say about the relation of gender to theology, human motivation, and God. An important epilogue by Mary Zahl contributes a contemporary woman's view of these fascinating historical figures. Extraordinary by any standard, Anne Boleyn, Anne Askew, Katharine Parr, Jane Grey, and Catherine Willoughby remain rich subjects for reflection and emulation hundreds of years later. The personalities of these five women, who spoke their Christian convictions with presence of mind and sharp intelligence within situations of life-and-death duress, are almost totemic in our enduring search for role models.

The English Reformation

Author: Arthur Geoffrey Dickens
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271007984
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book presents a new edition of the classic study of the religious changes that transformed England in the sixteenth century. Henry VIII officially brought the Protestant Reformation to England in the 1530s when he severed the English Church from the Papacy. But the seeds of the movement, according to A.G.Dickens, were planted much earlier. The English Reformation, first published in 1964, follows the movement from its late medieval origins through the settlement of Elizabeth I in 1559 and the rise of Puritanism.

Heretics and Believers

Author: Peter Marshall
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300226330
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A sumptuously written people’s history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall’s sweeping new history—the first major overview for general readers in a generation—argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of “reform” in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora’s Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of “religion” itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

Tudor Histories of the English Reformations 1530 83

Author: Thomas Betteridge
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351877399
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book examines the Tudor histories of the English Reformation written in the period 1530-83. All the reforming mid-Tudor regimes used historical discourses to support the religious changes they introduced. Indeed the English Reformation as a historical event was written, and rewritten, by Henrician, Edwardian, Marian and Elizabethan historians to provide legitimation for the religious policies of the government of the day. Starting with John Bale’s King Johan, this book examines these histories of the English Reformations. It addresses the issues behind Bale’s editions of the Examinations of Anne Askewe, discusses in detail the almost wholly neglected history writing of Mary Tudor’s reign and concludes with a discussion of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments. In the process of working chronologically through the Reformation historiography of the period 1530-1583 this book explores the ideological conflicts that mid-Tudor historians of the English Reformations addressed and the differences, but also the similarities often cutting across doctrinal differences, that existed between their texts.

The Reformation A Very Short Introduction

Author: Peter Marshall
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191578886
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Reformation transformed Europe, and left an indelible mark on the modern world. It began as an argument about what Christians needed to do to be saved, but rapidly engulfed society in a series of fundamental changes. This Very Short Introduction provides a lively and up-to-date guide to the process. It explains doctrinal debates in a clear and non-technical way, but is equally concerned to demonstrate the effects the Reformation had on politics, society, art, and minorities. Peter Marshall argues that the Reformation was not a solely European phenomenon, but that varieties of faith exported from Europe transformed Christianity into a truly world religion. The complex legacy of the Reformation is also assessed; its religious fervour produced remarkable stories of sanctity and heroism, and some extraordinary artistic achievements, but violence, holy war, and martyrdom were equally its products. A paradox of the Reformation - that it intensified intolerance while establishing pluralism - is one we still wrestle with today. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

A Short History of the Reformation

Author: Helen L. Parish
Publisher: I.B. Tauris
ISBN: 9781780766096
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When, in October 1517, Martin Luther pinned his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of All Saints' Church in Wittenberg he shattered the foundations of western Christendom. The Reformation of doctrine and practice that followed Luther's seismic action, and protest against the sale of indulgences, fragmented the Church and overturned previously accepted certainties and priorities. But it did more, challenging the relationship between spiritual and secular authority, perceptions of the supernatural, the interpretation of the past, the role of women in society and church, and clerical attitudes towards marriage and sex. Drawing on the most recent historiography, Helen L Parish locates the Protestant Reformation in its many cultural, social and political contexts. She assesses the Reformers' impact on art and architecture; on notions of authority, scripture and tradition; and—reflecting on the extent to which the printing press helped spread Reformation ideas—on oral, print and written culture.