A Revolution in Eating

Author: James E. McWilliams
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231129923
Format: PDF
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History of food in the United States.

A Revolution in Eating

Author: James E. McWilliams
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231503482
Format: PDF, ePub
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Sugar, pork, beer, corn, cider, scrapple, and hoppin' John all became staples in the diet of colonial America. The ways Americans cultivated and prepared food and the values they attributed to it played an important role in shaping the identity of the newborn nation. In A Revolution in Eating, James E. McWilliams presents a colorful and spirited tour of culinary attitudes, tastes, and techniques throughout colonial America. Confronted by strange new animals, plants, and landscapes, settlers in the colonies and West Indies found new ways to produce food. Integrating their British and European tastes with the demands and bounty of the rugged American environment, early Americans developed a range of regional cuisines. From the kitchen tables of typical Puritan families to Iroquois longhouses in the backcountry and slave kitchens on southern plantations, McWilliams portrays the grand variety and inventiveness that characterized colonial cuisine. As colonial America grew, so did its palate, as interactions among European settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves created new dishes and attitudes about food. McWilliams considers how Indian corn, once thought by the colonists as "fit for swine," became a fixture in the colonial diet. He also examines the ways in which African slaves influenced West Indian and American southern cuisine. While a mania for all things British was a unifying feature of eighteenth-century cuisine, the colonies discovered a national beverage in domestically brewed beer, which came to symbolize solidarity and loyalty to the patriotic cause in the Revolutionary era. The beer and alcohol industry also instigated unprecedented trade among the colonies and further integrated colonial habits and tastes. Victory in the American Revolution initiated a "culinary declaration of independence," prompting the antimonarchical habits of simplicity, frugality, and frontier ruggedness to define American cuisine. McWilliams demonstrates that this was a shift not so much in new ingredients or cooking methods, as in the way Americans imbued food and cuisine with values that continue to shape American attitudes to this day.

Paleo Perfected

Author: America's Test Kitchen
Publisher: America's Test Kitchen
ISBN: 1940352428
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This collection of foolproof, practical, and innovative recipes is an invaluable resource. Packed with test kitchen expertise, this book not only contains 150 foolproof recipes but will also teach you how to bake with nut flours, how to make a pan sauce without butter or wine, and how to make paleo-friendly pantry staples like crackers, coconut yogurt, and even barbecue sauce. Print run 150,000.

Revolution at the Table

Author: Harvey A. Levenstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520234390
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book, first published by OUP, is a classic of culinary history; with his discussion of the revolution that took place in American attitudes toward food between 1880 and 1930, Levenstein laid the the foundation for the social history of food in modern America.

The Real Meal Revolution

Author: Tim Noakes
Publisher: Robinson
ISBN: 1472135709
Format: PDF, Docs
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'Scientists labelled fat the enemy . . . they were wrong.' Time magazine We've been told for years that eating fat is bad for us, that it is a primary cause of high blood pressure, heart disease and obesity. The Real Meal Revolution debunks this lie and shows us the way back to restored health through eating what human beings are meant to eat. This book will radically transform your life by showing you clearly, and easily, how to take control of not just your weight, but your overall health, too - through what you eat. And you can eat meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, butter, nuts . . . often the first things to be prohibited or severely restricted on most diets. This is Banting, or Low-Carb, High-Fat (LCHF) eating, for a new generation, solidly underpinned by years of scientific research and by now incontrovertible evidence. This extraordinary book, already a phenomenal bestseller, overturns the conventional dietary wisdom of recent decades that placed carbohydrates at the base of the supposedly healthy-eating pyramid and that has led directly to a worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Both a startling revelation, and as old as humanity itself, it offers a truly revolutionary approach to healthy eating that explodes the myth, among others, that cholesterol is bad for us. This is emphatically not just another unsustainable, quick-fix diet or a fad waiting to be forgotten, but a long-delayed return to the way human beings are supposed to eat. The Real Meal Revolution is an ebook which maintains the design of the book, and as a result will not display correctly on some basic reading devices.

Paradox of Plenty

Author: Harvey A. Levenstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520234406
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is intended for those interested in US food habits and diets during the 20th century, American history, American social life and customs.

Just Food

Author: James E. McWilliams
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316052639
Format: PDF
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We suffer today from food anxiety, bombarded as we are with confusing messages about how to eat an ethical diet. Should we eat locally? Is organic really better for the environment? Can genetically modified foods be good for you? JUST FOOD does for fresh food what Fast Food Nation (Houghton Mifflin, 2001) did for fast food, challenging conventional views, and cutting through layers of myth and misinformation. For instance, an imported tomato is more energy-efficient than a local greenhouse-grown tomato. And farm-raised freshwater fish may soon be the most sustainable source of protein. Informative and surprising, JUST FOOD tells us how to decide what to eat, and how our choices can help save the planet and feed the world.

Eating Promiscuously

Author: James McWilliams
Publisher: Counterpoint LLC
ISBN: 9781640090323
Format: PDF
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"The need to reexamine assumptions about how we feed ourselves becomes ever more important. McWilliams does not shy from imagining radical solutions to these issues . . . Sure to be controversial." âe*Booklist The human practice of farming food has failed. There are 7,500 known varieties of domesticated apples; we regularly eat about five. Seventy-five percent of the world's food derives from five animals and twelve plants. Factory farmed meat is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions (about 14 percent, larger than transportation) and consumes 75 percent of the water in drought-prone regions such as the West. We are stuck in a rut of limited choices, and the vast majority of what we eat is detrimental to our health and the welfare of the planet. But what if we could eliminate agriculture as we know it? What if we could start over? James McWilliams's search for more expansive palate leads him to those who are actively exploring the fringes of what we can eat, a group of outliers seeking nutrition innovation outside the industrial food system. Here, we meet insect manufacturers, seaweed harvesters, road kill foragers, plant biologists, and oyster farmers who seek to open both our minds and our mouths--and to overturn our most basic assumptions about food, health, and ethics. Eating Promiscuously generates hope for a more tasteful future--one in which we eat thousands of foods rather than dozens--with a new philosophy that could save both ourselves and our planet. "The author's overriding assumption is that it would be better for people, animals, and the environment if our diets were more diversified. Hundreds of plants and protein sources, he rightly notes, are overlooked in favor of a narrow range of food . . . McWilliams presents a solid argument." --Kirkus Reviews

Eating History

Author: Andrew F. Smith
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231140932
Format: PDF
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Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts--in delicious detail--the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.