A Summer of Birds

Author: Danny Heitman
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807139639
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As the summer of 1821 began, John James Audubon's ambition to create a comprehensive pictorial record of American birds was still largely a dream. Then, out of economic necessity, Audubon came to Oakley Plantation, a sprawling estate in Louisiana's West Feliciana Parish. Teeming with an abundance of birds, the woods of Oakley galvanized Audubon's sense of possibility for one of the most audacious undertakings in the annals of art. In A Summer of Birds, journalist and essayist Danny Heitman sorts through the facts and romance of Audubon's summer at Oakley, a season that clearly shaped the destiny of the world's most famous bird artist. Heitman draws from a rich variety of sources -- including Audubon's own extensive journals, more recent Audubon scholarship, and Robert Penn Warren's poetry -- to create a stimulating excursion across time, linking the historical man Audubon to the present-day civic and cultural icon. He considers the financial straits that led to Audubon's employment at Oakley as a private tutor to fifteen-year-old Eliza Pirrie, Audubon's family history, his flamboyance as a master of self-invention, his naturalist and artistic techniques, and the possible reasons for his dismissal. Illustrations include photographs of Oakley House -- now a state historic site -- Audubon's paintings from his Oakley period, and portraits of the Pirrie family members. A favorable combination of climate and geography made Oakley a birding haven, and Audubon completed or began at least twenty-three bird paintings -- among his finest work -- while staying there. A Summer of Birds will inform and delight readers in its exploration of this eventful but unsung 1821 interlude, a fascinating chapter in the life of America's foremost bird artist. It is an indispensable pleasure for birders, Audubon enthusiasts, and visitors to Oakley House.

Successes Limitations and Frontiers in Ecosystem Science

Author: Michael L. Pace
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461217245
Format: PDF, ePub
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Ecosystem research has emerged in recent decades as a vital, successful, and sometimes controversial approach to environmental science. This book emphasizes the idea that much of the progress in ecosystem research has been driven by the emergence of new environmental problems that could not be addressed by existing approaches. By focusing on successes and limitations of ecosystems studies, the book explores avenues for future ecosystem-level research.

On the Front Lines of the Cold War

Author: Seymour Topping
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807137307
Format: PDF
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The well-known New York Times correspondent narrates his experiences reporting on some of major events and conflicts of the years following World War II and discusses his interviews with such political figures as Mao Tse Tung and Fidel Castro.

A Birder s Guide to Louisiana

Author: Paul E. Lehman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781878788436
Format: PDF
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"If you like seeing large numbers of birds, you'll love Louisiana. Probably no state in the USA can compete with Louisiana in terms of bird spectacles. Bird density in general is higher here than almost anywhere in the country, and some of the concentrations are stunning. This birdfinding guide will help more people appreciate our state for the special birding area that it is." J. Van Remsen, Jr., Ph. D.

Supercritical

Author: Peter Eisenman
Publisher: Architectural Association
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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In January 2006 Peter Eisenman joined Rem Koolhaas at the Architectural Association for an evening of conversation about architecture, ideology, and the city. Their dialogue forms the basis for the first volume of AA Words, a series emphasizing the written word as the basis for critical debate by contemporary architects and theorists. Each architect states his views about the terms of architecture, including its theories and relationship to the city and other forms of critical and cultural practice. As a coda to the conversation, the book includes contributions by Jeffrey Kipnis, Robert E. Somol, and Brett Steele, who offer their personal interpretations of the critical practices of Eisenman and Koolhaas.

The Audubon Reader

Author: John James Audubon
Publisher: Everyman's Library
ISBN: 0375712704
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This unprecedented anthology of John James Audubon’s lively and colorful writings about the American wilderness reintroduces the great artist and ornithologist as an exceptional American writer, a predecessor to Thoreau, Emerson, and Melville. Audubon’s award-winning biographer, Richard Rhodes, has gathered excerpts from his journals, letters, and published works, and has organized them to appeal to general readers. Rhodes’s unobtrusive commentary frames a wide range of selections, including Audubon’s vivid “bird biographies,” correspondence with his devoted wife, Lucy, journal accounts of dramatic river journeys and hunting trips with the Shawnee and Osage Indians, and a generous sampling of brief narrative episodes that have long been out of print—engaging stories of pioneer life such as "The Great Pine Swamp," “The Earthquake,” and “Kentucky Barbecue on the Fourth of July.” Full-color reproductions of sixteen of Audubon’s stunning watercolor illustrations accompany the text. The Audubon Reader allows us to experience Audubon’s distinctive voice directly and provides a window into his electrifying encounter with early America: with its wildlife and birds, its people, and its primordial wilderness. (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Speaking for the Enslaved

Author: Antoinette T Jackson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315419955
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Focusing on the agency of enslaved Africans and their descendants in the South, this work argues for the systematic unveiling and recovery of subjugated knowledge, histories, and cultural practices of those traditionally silenced and overlooked by national heritage projects and national public memories. Jackson uses both ethnographic and ethnohistorical data to show the various ways African Americans actively created and maintained their own heritage and cultural formations. Viewed through the lens of four distinctive plantation sites—including the one on which that the ancestors of First Lady Michelle Obama lived—everyday acts of living, learning, and surviving profoundly challenge the way American heritage has been constructed and represented. A fascinating, critical view of the ways culture, history, social policy, and identity influence heritage sites and the business of heritage research management in public spaces.