Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law

Author: Matthew Warshauer
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9781572336247
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Lucid and well-researched." --The New Yorker In order to win the famous battle of New Orleans, Andrew Jackson believed that it was necessary to declare martial law and suspend the writ of habeas corpus. In doing so, he achieved both a great victory and the notoriety of being the first American general to ever suspend civil liberties in America. Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law tells the history of Jackson's use of martial law and how the controversy surrounding it followed him throughout his life. The work engages the age-old controversy over if, when, and who should be able to subvert the Constitution during times of national emergency. It also engages the continuing historical controversy over Jackson's political prowess and the importance of the rise of party politics during the early republic. As such, the book contributes to both the scholarship on Jackson and the legal and constitutional history of the intersection between the military and civilian spheres. To fully understand the history of martial law and the subsequent evolution of a theory of emergency powers, Matthew Warshauer asserts, one must also understand the political history surrounding the discussion of civil liberties and how Jackson's stature as a political figure and his expertise as a politician influenced such debates. Warshauer further explains that Abraham Lincoln cited Jackson's use of the military and suspension of civil liberties as justification for similar decisions during the Civil War. During both Jackson's and Lincoln's use of martial law, critics declared that such an action stood in opposition to both the Constitution and the nation's cherished republican principles of protecting liberty from dangerous power, especially that of the military. Supporters of martial law insisted that saving the nation became the preeminent cause when the republic was endangered. At the heart of such arguments lurked the partisan maneuvering of opposing political parties. Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law is a powerful examination of the history of martial law, its first use in the United States, and the consequent development of emergency powers for both military commanders and presidents. Matthew Warshauer is associate professor of history at Central Connecticut State University. He is the author of the forthcoming Andrew Jackson: First Men, America's Presidents. His articles have appeared in Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Connecticut History, Louisiana History, and New York History.

Andrew Jackson Southerner

Author: Mark R. Cheathem
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807151009
Format: PDF
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Many Americans view Andrew Jackson as a frontiersman who fought duels, killed Indians, and stole another man's wife. Historians have traditionally presented Jackson as a man who struggled to overcome the obstacles of his backwoods upbringing and helped create a more democratic United States. In his compelling new biography of Jackson, Mark R. Cheathem argues for a reassessment of these long-held views, suggesting that in fact "Old Hickory" lived as an elite southern gentleman. Jackson grew up along the border between North Carolina and South Carolina, a district tied to Charleston, where the city's gentry engaged in the transatlantic marketplace. Jackson then moved to North Carolina, where he joined various political and kinship networks that provided him with entrée into society. In fact, Cheathem contends, Jackson had already started to assume the characteristics of a southern gentleman by the time he arrived in Middle Tennessee in 1788. After moving to Nashville, Jackson further ensconced himself in an exclusive social order by marrying the daughter of one of the city's cofounders, engaging in land speculation, and leading the state militia. Cheathem notes that through these ventures Jackson grew to own multiple plantations and cultivated them with the labor of almost two hundred slaves. His status also enabled him to build a military career focused on eradicating the nation's enemies, including Indians residing on land desired by white southerners. Jackson's military success eventually propelled him onto the national political stage in the 1820s, where he won two terms as president. Jackson's years as chief executive demonstrated the complexity of the expectations of elite white southern men, as he earned the approval of many white southerners by continuing to pursue Manifest Destiny and opposing the spread of abolitionism, yet earned their ire because of his efforts to fight nullification and the Second Bank of the United States. By emphasizing Jackson's southern identity -- characterized by violence, honor, kinship, slavery, and Manifest Destiny -- Cheathem's narrative offers a bold new perspective on one of the nineteenth century's most renowned and controversial presidents.

Martial Law and English Laws c 1500 c 1700

Author: John M. Collins
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316654141
Format: PDF, Docs
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John M. Collins presents the first comprehensive history of martial law in the early modern period. He argues that rather than being a state of exception from law, martial law was understood and practiced as one of the King's laws. Further, it was a vital component of both England's domestic and imperial legal order. It was used to quell rebellions during the Reformation, to subdue Ireland, to regulate English plantations like Jamestown, to punish spies and traitors in the English Civil War, and to build forts on Jamaica. Through outlining the history of martial law, Collins reinterprets English legal culture as dynamic, politicized, and creative, where jurists were inspired by past practices to generate new law rather than being restrained by it. This work asks that legal history once again be re-integrated into the cultural and political histories of early modern England and its empire.

Andrew Jackson in Context

Author: Matthew Warshauer
Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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For over a century historians have been unable to agree about Andrew Jackson. Was he as Robert Remini has insisted for more than forty years a masterful politician who shaped the modern presidency and ushered in an era of new democratic politics? Or was he, as James C. Curtis and Andrew Burstein have argued, a loose cannon who possessed no vision for the American republic? What historians do not doubt is Jackson's significant and lasting impact on American politics and the nation. To fully assess his role and legacy, one must explore the interaction between his personal and political motivations and the larger developments of the early republic and antebellum period. In Andrew Jackson in Context, Matthew Warshauer, Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University and author of Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law, offers a detailed look at differing historians' views on Jackson and places these perspectives within an accessible biography of the seventh president. Warshauer insists that any study of Jackson must place him within the context of his time and that his motivations regarding such pivotal issues as economics and the preservation of the Union cannot be divorced from the very real and turbulent politics of the Jacksonian period. The author discounts the psychological driven theories of authors like Curtis and Burstein, though recognises that Jackson was often a vain, blustering, power-driven man who when he deemed it necessary had no qualms about violating the Constitution. This is an engaging, well-written biography that is perfect for students and those who want to understand not only Jackson and his era, but what historians have written about him.

Connecticut in the American Civil War

Author: Matthew Warshauer
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 9780819571397
Format: PDF, ePub
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Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state’s involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and after the war; Connecticut’s reaction to the firing on Fort Sumter; the dissent in the state over whether or not the sword and musket should be raised against the South; the raising of troops; the sacrifice of those who served on the front and at home; and the need for closure after the war. This book is a concise, amazing account of a complex and troubling war. No one interested in this period of American history can afford to miss reading this important contribution to our national and local stories. The paperback edition includes a reading guide, which is also available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/e-books/materials/warshauer_reading_guide.pdf