Bacteria and Bayonets

Author: David Petriello
Publisher: Casemate
ISBN: 1612003427
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For hundreds of years men have fought and died to expand and protect the United States relying on martial skill and patriotism. Various powerful enemies, from the British to the Nazis, and legendary individuals including Tecumseh and Robert E. Lee have all fallen before the arms of the American soldier. Yet the deadliest enemy faced by the nation, one which killed more soldiers than all of its foes combined, has been both unrecognized and unseen. The war waged by the United States against disease, and by disease against the United States, has impacted the country more than any other conflict and continues to present a terrible threat to this day. Illness has been more than just a historical cause of casualties for the American military, in numerous wars it has helped to decide battles, drive campaigns, and determine strategy. In fact the Patriots owed pestilence as much for their victory in the Revolution as they did their own force of arms. Likewise disease helped to prevent the conquest of Canada in 1812, drove strategy in the Mexican War, handicapped Lee’s 1862 advance, and helped lead to World War II. Disease also provided an edge in the wars against Native Americans, yet just as soon turned on the US when unacclimated US troops were dispatched to the southern Pacific. This book not only traces the path of disease in American military history but also recounts numerous small episodes and interesting anecdotes related to the history of illness. Overall it presents a compelling story, one that has been overlooked and under appreciated. Yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, glanders, bubonic plague, smallpox, and numerous other bacteria and viruses all conspired to defeat America, and are enemies that need to be recognized.

Tide of War

Author: David R. Petriello
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 151072821X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The first comprehensive look at nature’s role on military history. Halley’s Comet helped to announce the fall of the Shang Dynasty in China, a solar eclipse frightened the Macedonian army enough at Pydna in 168 BC to ensure victory for the Romans, a massive rain storm turned the field of Agincourt to mud in 1415 and gave Henry V his legendary victory, fog secured the throne of England for Edward IV at Barnet in 1471, wind and disease conspired to wreck the Spanish Armada, snow served to prevent the American capture of Quebec in 1775 and confined the Revolution to the Thirteen Colonies, and an earthquake helped to spark the Peloponnesian War. But this is only a small sampling of the many instances where nature has tipped the balance in combat. Over the past 4000 years, weather and nature have both hindered and helped various campaigns and battles, occasionally even altering the course of history in the process. Today elements of nature still affect the planning and waging of war, even as we have tried to mitigate its impact. The growing concern over climate change has only heightened the need to study and understand this subject. Tide of War is the first book to comprehensively tackle this topic and traces some of the most notable intersections between nature and war since ancient times.

The Blue Gray Almanac

Author: Albert Nofi
Publisher: Casemate Publishers
ISBN: 1612005535
Format: PDF, Docs
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Albert Nofi tells the story of the American War through a range of insightful essays, anecdotes, and facts. Did you know... • During the final days of the war, some Richmond citizens would throw “Starvation Parties,” at which elegantly attired guests would gather at soirees where the finest silver and crystal tableware was used, though there were usually no refreshments except water. • Union Rear-Admiral Goldsborough was nicknamed “Old Guts”, not so much for his combativeness as for his heft, weighing about 300 pounds, and was described as “. . . a huge mass of inert matter.” • 30.6 percent of the 425 Confederate generals, but only 21.6 percent of the 583 Union generals, had been lawyers before the war. • In 1861, J. P. Morgan made a huge profit by buying 5,000 condemned US Army carbines and selling them back to another arsenal, taking the Army to court when they tried to refuse to pay for the faulty weapons. • Major General Loring was reputed to have so rich a vocabulary than one of the men once remarked he could "curse a cannon up hill without horses." • Many militia units had a favorite drink, the Charleston Light Dragoons’ punch took around a week to make while the Chatham Artillery required 1 pound of green tea leaves be steeped overnight. • There were five living former presidents when the Civil War began, and seven veterans of the war (plus one draft dodger) went on to serve as President.

World Epidemics

Author: Mary Ellen Snodgrass
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476631069
Format: PDF, Mobi
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 In its expanded second edition, this chronology examines the effects of epidemic illness and death on human culture from 2700 bce to 2017. Entries summarize incidents of contagion across the globe, including symptoms, treatment, prevention and demographics, as well as biographical information on notable people who identified and battled disease. Entries feature citations from personal and public documents along with maps, charts comparing types of infection, and estimated populations affected by each epidemic.

Alexander Hamilton s Revolution

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1510716602
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Despite his less-than-promising beginnings as the only key Founding Father not born and raised on American soil, Hamilton was one of the best and brightest of his generation. His notoriety has rested almost entirely on his role as Secretary of the Treasury in Washington's administration, yet few realize that Washington and Hamilton's bond was forged during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton's Revolution is the first book to explore Hamilton's critical role during the battle for independence. New information presents a little-known and underpublished aspect of Hamilton's life: that he was not only Washington's favorite staff officer, but also his right-hand man for most of the Revolution, serving as Chief of Staff from 1777 to early 1781. While he found this position rewarding, Hamilton continually asked Washington for a field command. Hamilton's wish was granted at the decisive battle of Yorktown, where his Infantry Battalion charged on the defensive bastion on Cornwallis's left flank. Hamilton's capture of this position, while French forced captured the adjacent position, sealed Cornwallis's fate and forced his surrender and ultimate colonial victory. The entire patriotic cause benefited immeasurably from the advice and strategies provided to Washington by his youngest staff officer, Alexander Hamilton. Now, those critical contributions are brought to light in Hamilton's Revolution.

Medicine and the American Revolution

Author: Oscar Reiss, M.D.
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786421606
Format: PDF, ePub
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Nearly nine times as many died from diseases during the American Revolution as did from wounds. Poor diet, inadequate sanitation and sometimes a lack of basic medical care caused such diseases as dysentery, scurvy, typhus, smallpox and others to decimate the ranks. Scurvy was a major problem for both the British and American navies, while venereal diseases proved to be a particularly vexing problem in New York. Respiratory diseases, scabies and other illnesses left nearly 4,000 colonial troops unable to fight when George Washington's troops broke camp at Valley Forge in June 1778. From a physician's perspective, this is a unique history of the American Revolution and how diseases impacted the execution of the war effort. The medical histories of Washington and King George III are also provided.

The Days of Heroes Are Over

Author: David Petriello
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781633914032
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Over the last 200 years, the country has elected a variety of colorful figures to national office. Drunkards, racists, slave holders, philanderers, war heroes, populists, demagogues, humanitarians, misogynists, embezzlers, patriots, and nepotists, all have walked the halls of the Capitol and the White House. Yet rarely has a man been sent to Washington who could be defined by all of those descriptors at once. Richard Mentor Johnson of Kentucky was one of those men. His heroic, controversial, and eccentric life made him notorious in his day, a tragic hero who walked the stage of American politics for almost half a century. Col. Dick Johnson was the epitome of a frontier Republican from the early part of the 19th century. Born into a politically active family which had migrated west during the Revolution, his early years were shaped by the Indian warfare that plagued the region. He himself achieved notoriety due to his successes against the great Native leader Tecumseh at the Battle of the Thames, allegedly killing the war-chief himself. Johnson then went on to serve in various positions in the government, at all times being involved in the growth of the nation. His eccentricities as Vice President, when combined with his scandalous relationships with various African American women, resulted in his eventual damnatio memoriae. This biography seeks to fill the gap in the historical record, examining the life and accomplishments of one of America's more storied Vice Presidents. David R. Petriello has taught and written on various subjects in American history. His specialties include military history, the impact of disease upon history and society, and 19th political thought. Recent publications by the author include A Military History of New Jersey, Bacteria and Bayonets: The Impact of Disease in American Military History, and an upcoming work on disease and the American presidency.

A Pestilence on Pennsylvania Avenue

Author: David R. Petriello
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781939995179
Format: PDF, Docs
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"A Pestilence on Pennsylvania Avenue" explores the impact and influence of disease and illness on the American presidency, including the vice presidents and First Ladies, from the time of George Washington to Barack Obama. An intriguing and gripping read, especially in this presidential election year.

Intimate Bonds

Author: Jennifer L. Palmer
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812293061
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Following the stories of families who built their lives and fortunes across the Atlantic Ocean, Intimate Bonds explores how households anchored the French empire and shaped the meanings of race, slavery, and gender in the early modern period. As race-based slavery became entrenched in French laws, all household members in the French Atlantic world —regardless of their status, gender, or race—negotiated increasingly stratified legal understandings of race and gender. Through her focus on household relationships, Jennifer L. Palmer reveals how intimacy not only led to the seemingly immutable hierarchies of the plantation system but also caused these hierarchies to collapse even before the age of Atlantic revolutions. Placing families at the center of the French Atlantic world, Palmer uses the concept of intimacy to illustrate how race, gender, and the law intersected to form a new worldview. Through analysis of personal, mercantile, and legal relationships, Intimate Bonds demonstrates that even in an era of intensifying racial stratification, slave owners and slaves, whites and people of color, men and women all adapted creatively to growing barriers, thus challenging the emerging paradigm of the nuclear family. This engagingly written history reveals that personal choices and family strategies shaped larger cultural and legal shifts in the meanings of race, slavery, family, patriarchy, and colonialism itself.

Gendered Crossings

Author: Allyson M. Poska
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826356443
Format: PDF, ePub
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Between 1778 and 1784 the Spanish Crown transported more than 1,900 peasants, including 875 women and girls, from northern Spain to South America in an ill-fated scheme to colonize Patagonia. The story begins as the colonists trudge across northern Spain to volunteer for the project and follows them across the Atlantic to Montevideo. However, before the last ships reached the Americas, harsh weather, disease, and the prospect of mutiny on the Patagonian coast forced the Crown to abandon the project. Eventually, the peasant colonists were resettled in towns outside of Buenos Aires and Montevideo, where they raised families, bought slaves, and gradually integrated into colonial society. Gendered Crossings brings to life the diverse settings of the Iberian Atlantic and the transformations in the peasants’ gendered experiences as they moved around the Spanish Empire.