Cades Cove

Author: Durwood Dunn
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572337648
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Cades Cove The Life and Death of a Southern Appalachian Community, 1818-1937 Durwood Dunn Winner of the Thomas Wolfe Literary Award! Drawing on a rich trove of documents never before available to scholars, the author sketches the early pioneers, their daily lives, their beliefs, and their struggles to survive and prosper in this isolated mountain community, now within the confines of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In moving detail this book brings to life an isolated mountain community, its struggle to survive, and the tragedy of its demise. "Professor Dunn provides us with a model historical investigation of a southern mountain community. His findings on commercial farming, family, religion, and politics will challenge many standard interpretations of the Appalachian past." --Gordon B. McKinney, Western Carolina University. "This is a fine book. . . . It is mostly about community and interrelationships, and thus it refutes much of the literature that presents Southern Mountaineers as individualistic, irreligious, violent, and unlawful." —Loyal Jones, Appalachian Heritage. "Dunn . . . has written one of the best books ever produced about the Southern mountains." —Virginia Quarterly Review. "This study offers the first detailed analysis of a remote southern Appalachian community in the nineteenth century. It should lay to rest older images of the region as isolated and static, but it raises new questions about the nature of that premodern community." —Ronald D Eller, American Historical Review Not only is his book a worthy addition to the growing body of work recognizing the complexities of southern mountain society; it is also a lively testament to the value of local history and the variety of levels at which it can provide significant enlightenment." —John C. Inscoe,LOCUS

A Cades Cove Childhood

Author: Margaret McCaulley
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625843771
Format: PDF, ePub
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The remote Smoky Mountain community of Cades Cove still lives in the memory of J.C. McCaulley, one of the few remaining former residents, who offers an exclusive glimpse into a childhood in the Cove. His stories, compiled by his wife Margaret, are a testament to a way of life long abandoned—a life before automobiles, television and perhaps too much exposure to the outside world; a life of hard work and caring for your neighbors. Join the McCaulleys in their quest to preserve the beauty, tranquility and traditions of this pristine community, and dare to dream of a way of life that encouraged independence, integrity and the courage to overcome adversity.

Cades Cove

Author: Bill Lea
Publisher: Mountain Trail PressLlc
ISBN: 9780977793372
Format: PDF
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One of the most popular destinations within Great Smoky Mountains National Park is Cades Cove, and this book showcases its splendor and provides an intimate glimpse of the history behind the beauty of this special place. Preserved by the Great Smoky Mountain National Park to look much the way it looked in the 1800s, Cades Cove's pastoral charm, numerous historic cabins, barns and churches, and incredible wildlife viewing opportunities attract more than two million visitors each year. Whether planning to visit the park or seeking a keepsake from a recent visit, readers will find this guide packed with stunning photography and insights.

Appalachians All

Author: Mark T. Banker
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572337729
Format: PDF, Docs
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“A singular achievement. Mark Banker reveals an almost paradoxical Appalachia that trumps all the stereotypes. Interweaving his family history with the region’s latest scholarship, Banker uncovers deep psychological and economic interconnections between East Tennessee’s ‘three Appalachias’—its tourist-laden Smokies, its urbanized Valley, and its strip-mined Plateau.” —Paul Salstrom, author of Appalachia’s Path to Dependency "Banker weaves a story of Appalachia that is at once a national and regional history, a family saga, and a personal odyssey. This book reads like a conversation with a good friend who is well-read and well-informed, thoughtful, wise, and passionate about his subject. He brings new insights to those who know the region well, but, more importantly, he will introduce the region's complexities to a wider audience." —Jean Haskell, coeditor, Encyclopedia of Appalachia Appalachians All intertwines the histories of three communities—Knoxville with its urban life, Cades Cove with its farming, logging, and tourism legacies, and the Clearfork Valley with its coal production—to tell a larger story of East Tennessee and its inhabitants. Combining a perceptive account of how industrialization shaped developments in these communities since the Civil War with a heartfelt reflection on Appalachian identity, Mark Banker provides a significant new regional history with implications that extend well beyond East Tennessee’s boundaries. Writing with the keen eye of a native son who left the area only to return years later, Banker uses elements of his own autobiography to underscore the ways in which East Tennesseans, particularly “successful” urban dwellers, often distance themselves from an Appalachian identity. This understandable albeit regrettable response, Banker suggests, diminishes and demeans both the individual and region, making stereotypically “Appalachian” conditions self-perpetuating. Whether exploring grassroots activism in the Clearfork Valley, the agrarian traditions and subsequent displacement of Cades Cove residents, or Knoxvillians’ efforts to promote trade, tourism, and industry, Banker’s detailed historical excursions reveal not only a profound richness and complexity in the East Tennessee experience but also a profound interconnectedness. Synthesizing the extensive research and revisionist interpretations of Appalachia that have emerged over the last thirty years, Banker offers a new lens for constructively viewing East Tennessee and its past. He challenges readers to reconsider ideas that have long diminished the region and to re-imagine Appalachia. And ultimately, while Appalachians All speaks most directly to East Tennesseans and other Appalachian residents, it also carries important lessons for any reader seeking to understand the crucial connections between history, self, and place. Mark T. Banker, a history teacher at Webb School of Knoxville, resides on the farm where he was raised in nearby Roane County. He earned his PhD at the University of New Mexico and is the author of Presbyterian Missions and Cultural Interaction in the Far Southwest, 1850–1950. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Presbyterian History, Journal of the West, OAH Magazine of History, and Appalachian Journal.

Blue Ridge Commons

Author: Kathryn Newfont
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820341258
Format: PDF
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"In the late twentieth century, residents of the Blue Ridge mountains in western North Carolina fiercely resisted certain environmental efforts, even while launching aggressive initiatives of their own. Kathryn Newfont provides context for those events by examining the environmental history of this region over the course of three hundred years, identifying what she calls commons environmentalism--a cultural strain of conservation in American history that has gone largely unexplored. Efforts in the 1970s to expand federal wilderness areas in the Pisgah and Nantahala national forests generated strong opposition. For many mountain residents the idea of unspoiled wilderness seemed economically unsound, historically dishonest, and elitist. Newfont shows that local people's sense of commons environmentalism required access to the forests that they viewed as semipublic places for hunting, fishing, and working. Policies that removed large tracts from use were perceived as 'enclosure' and resisted. Incorporating deep archival work and years of interviews and conversations with Appalachian residents, Blue Ridge Commons reveals a tradition of people building robust forest protection movements on their own terms."--p. [4] of cover.

Lost Elkmont

Author: Daniel L. Paulin
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467113824
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Prior to the formation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) in 1934, the small community of Elkmont was established as a logging camp by Col. Wilson B. Townsend's Little River Lumber Company around 1908. This was after he purchased 86,000 acres of mostly virgin forest. The area that was previously inhabited by various American Indian groups, and later by European-American settlers beginning around 1830, was to become for a time the second largest town in Sevier County, Tennessee. Colonel Townsend's business ventures proved successful beyond expectation, as he skillfully exploited the area's valuable hardwood forests. His logging company and railroad provided a mountain population with jobs and steady wages. Once all the valuable timber was harvested, Townsend sold land to private citizens who established what was to become an exclusive summer community that included both the Appalachian and Wonderland Clubs. These coexisted inside the GSMNP until 1992. This is the story of Elkmont.

Cades Cove

Author: Missy Tipton Green
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738588223
Format: PDF, ePub
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Cades Cove came into existence in 1821, when William "Fighting Billy" Tipton was granted 1,280 acres of fine fertile land in the first recorded legal land title to Cades Cove following the Calhoun Treaty of 1819. The area was established as the 16th Civil District of Blount County. At its peak in 1900, the census showed that there were 125 families living in the cove and over 700 individuals. The Cades Cove people were self-sufficient and had many conveniences that others did not. Some residents made their own water system, and there were blacksmiths, coffin makers, farmers, storekeepers, postmasters, and many more occupations--there was no need to go out of their beloved cove for anything. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, this land was obtained by the State of Tennessee through eminent domain, and it later became the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The Walker Sisters

Author: Bonnie Trentham Myers
Publisher: Myers & Myers Pub
ISBN: 9780972783934
Format: PDF
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"The Walker Sisters" describes the lives of five unmarried women who remain in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park after their neighbors move away when the park is created.

Appalachia in the Making

Author: Mary Beth Pudup
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807888966
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Appalachia first entered the American consciousness as a distinct region in the decades following the Civil War. The place and its people have long been seen as backwards and 'other' because of their perceived geographical, social, and economic isolation. These essays, by fourteen eminent historians and social scientists, illuminate important dimensions of early social life in diverse sections of the Appalachian mountains. The contributors seek to place the study of Appalachia within the context of comparative regional studies of the United States, maintaining that processes and patterns thought to make the region exceptional were not necessarily unique to the mountain South. The contributors are Mary K. Anglin, Alan Banks, Dwight B. Billings, Kathleen M. Blee, Wilma A. Dunaway, John R. Finger, John C. Inscoe, Ronald L. Lewis, Ralph Mann, Gordon B. McKinney, Mary Beth Pudup, Paul Salstrom, Altina L. Waller, and John Alexander Williams