Changing Urban Education

Author: Simon Pratt-Adams
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1847060242
Format: PDF, ePub
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Introduces the debate surrounding teaching and learning in urban settings in contemporary Britain, and the impact this has on education. >

Changing urban education

Author: Clarence Nathan Stone
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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With critical issues like desegregation and funding facing our schools, dissatisfaction with public education has reached a new high. Teachers decry inadequate resources while critics claim educators are more concerned with job security than effective teaching. Though urban education has reached crisis proportions, contending players have difficulty agreeing on common program of action. This book tells why.

The Changing Urban School

Author: Robert Thornbury
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415675693
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The author takes a long look at what goes on in schools, and the roles played by people specifically concerned with them: but finally the problems of the school are seen as indissolubly bound up with the changes that have overtaken urban life. The school cannot be isolated, teachers, administrators, planners and parents must actively co-operate in making the school work in society and a society which works for the school. Nothing other than such a total vision, he concludes, will enable us to achieve normal educational goals. Robert Thornbury writes out of fifteen years experience of the urban school and of the problems not only of Britain but also those sometime similar, often more acute, of other countries, in particular the United States and Australia. The need for a total urban strategy is worldwide. His point of view is broad-based but his sympathies lie most of all with the hard-working teacher who stayed on in the urban classroom. It is a book for teachers therefore, but also, by its own argument, for all concerned with the future of the inner-city and the reordering of education.

Multiethnic Moments

Author: Susan E. Clarke
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592135387
Format: PDF, Docs
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Is anyone listening to minority voices in reforming American schools?

The New Political Economy of Urban Education

Author: Pauline Lipman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136759999
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Urban education and its contexts have changed in powerful ways. Old paradigms are being eclipsed by global forces of privatization and markets and new articulations of race, class, and urban space. These factors and more set the stage for Pauline Lipman's insightful analysis of the relationship between education policy and the neoliberal economic, political, and ideological processes that are reshaping cities in the United States and around the globe. Using Chicago as a case study of the interconnectedness of neoliberal urban policies on housing, economic development, race, and education, Lipman explores larger implications for equity, justice, and "the right to the city". She draws on scholarship in critical geography, urban sociology and anthropology, education policy, and critical analyses of race. Her synthesis of these lenses gives added weight to her critical appraisal and hope for the future, offering a significant contribution to current arguments about urban schooling and how we think about relations between neoliberal education reforms and the transformation of cities. By examining the cultural politics of why and how these relationships resonate with people's lived experience, Lipman pushes the analysis one step further toward a new educational and social paradigm rooted in radical political and economic democracy.

So much reform so little change

Author: Charles M. Payne
Publisher: Harvard Educational Pub Group
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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This frank and courageous book explores the persistence of failure in todays urban schools. At its heart is the argument that most education policy discussions are disconnected from the daily realities of urban schools, especially those in poor and beleaguered neighborhoods. Charles M. Payne argues that we have failed to account fully for the weakness of the social infrastructure and the often dysfunctional organizational environments of urban schools and school systems. The result is that liberals and conservatives alike have spent a great deal of time pursuing questions of limited practical value in the effort to improve city schools.Payne carefully delineates these stubborn and intertwined sources of failure in urban school reform efforts of the past two decades. Yet while his book is unsparing in its exploration of the troubled recent history of urban school reform, Payne also describes himself as guardedly optimistic. He describes how, in the last decade, we have developed real insights into the roots of school failure, and into how some individual schools manage to improve. He also examines recent progress in understanding how particular urban districts have established successful reforms on a larger scale.Drawing on a striking array of sourcesfrom the recent history of various urban school systems, to the growing sophistication of education research, to his own experience as a teacher, scholar, and participant in reform effortsPayne paints a vivid and unmistakably realistic portrait of urban schools and reforms of the past few decades. So Much Reform, So Little Change will be required reading for everyone interested in the plightand the futureof urban schools.

See You when We Get There

Author: Gregory Michie
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807745199
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Gregory Michie's first bestseller, Holler If You Hear Me, put him on the map as a compelling and passionate voice in urban education. In his new book, Michie turns his attention to young teachers of colour, and once again provides readers with a unique and penetrating look inside public school classrooms. Featuring portraits of five young teachers (two African Americans, two Latinas, and one Asian American) who are working for change, Michie weaves the teachers' powerful voices with classroom vignettes and his own experiences. Along the way, he examines what motivates and sustains these teachers, as well as what they see as the challenges and possibilities of public education. In these times of national standards, high-stakes accountability, and calls for reforming teacher education and preparation, See You When We Get There/i> is essential reading.

Radical Possibilities

Author: Jean Anyon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136202218
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The core argument of Jean Anyon’s classic Radical Possibilities is deceptively simple: if we do not direct our attention to the ways in which federal and metropolitan policies maintain the poverty that plagues communities in American cities, urban school reform as currently conceived is doomed to fail. With every chapter thoroughly revised and updated, this edition picks up where the 2005 publication left off, including a completely new chapter detailing how three decades of political decisions leading up to the “Great Recession” produced an economic crisis of epic proportions. By tracing the root causes of the financial crisis, Anyon effectively demonstrates the concrete effects of economic decision-making on the education sector, revealing in particular the disastrous impacts of these policies on black and Latino communities. Going beyond lament, Radical Possibilities offers those interested in a better future for the millions of America’s poor families a set of practical and theoretical insights. Expanding on her paradigm for combating educational injustice, Anyon discusses the Occupy Wall Street movement as a recent example of popular resistance in this new edition, set against a larger framework of civil rights history. A ringing call to action, Radical Possibilities reminds readers that throughout U.S. history, equitable public policies have typically been created as a result of the political pressure brought to bear by social movements. Ultimately, Anyon’s revelations teach us that the current moment contains its own very real radical possibilities.

Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools

Author: Edna Tan
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226037991
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Math and science hold powerful places in contemporary society, setting the foundations for entry into some of the most robust and highest-paying industries. However, effective math and science education is not equally available to all students, with some of the poorest students—those who would benefit most—going egregiously underserved. This ongoing problem with education highlights one of the core causes of the widening class gap. While this educational inequality can be attributed to a number of economic and political causes, in Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Communities, Angela Calabrese Barton and Edna Tan demonstrate that it is augmented by a consistent failure to integrate student history, culture, and social needs into the core curriculum. They argue that teachers and schools should create hybrid third spaces—neither classroom nor home—in which underserved students can merge their personal worlds with those of math and science. A host of examples buttress this argument: schools where these spaces have been instituted now provide students not only an immediate motivation to engage the subjects most critical to their future livelihoods but also the broader math and science literacy necessary for robust societal engagement. A unique look at a frustratingly understudied subject, Empowering Science and Mathematics Education pushes beyond the idea of teaching for social justice and into larger questions of how and why students participate in math and science.

Changing Urban Landscapes Through Public Higher Education

Author: Burtin, Anika Spratley
Publisher: IGI Global
ISBN: 1522534555
Format: PDF, ePub
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Outreach and engagement initiatives are crucial in promoting community development. This can be achieved through a number of methods, including institutions of higher education. Changing Urban Landscapes Through Public Higher Education is a critical scholarly resource that examines the unique ways in which the faculty and students of the public institution of higher learning, in and for the nation’s capital, connect to the community. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics such as civic engagement, service learning, and teacher preparation, this book is geared towards educators, administration, academicians, researchers, and students seeking current research on collaborative efforts between communities and institutions of higher education.