China s Legalists The Early Totalitarians

Author: Zhengyuan Fu
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315285231
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This text discusses the Chinese Legalists, an ancient school of Chinese philosophy which flourished during the Period of the Hundred Contending Schools (6th-3rd century B.C.E.) The school perfected the science of government and art of statecraft to a level that would have greatly impressed Machiavelli. This period and its personalities, as well as a taste of the style and spirit of the Legalists' discourse, are made accessible to the student and general reader, placing into focus the roots of the great Chinese philosophy-as-statecraft tradition. The Legalists - most famously Li Kui, Shang Yang, Shen Buhai, Shen Dao, and Han Fei - had a great impact not only on the institutions and practices of Chinese imperial tradition but also on the Maoist totalitarianism of the People's Republic of China.

Writing Chinese Laws

Author: Ernest Caldwell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351180665
Format: PDF
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The legal institutions of the short-lived Qin dynasty (221–207 BCE) have been vilified by history as harsh and draconian. Yet ironically, many Qin institutional features, such as written statutory law, were readily adopted by subsequent dynasties as the primary means for maintaining administrative and social control. This book utilizes both traditional texts and archeologically excavated materials to explore how these influential Qin legal institutions developed. First, it investigates the socio-political conditions which led to the production of law in written form. It then goes on to consider how the intended function of written law influenced the linguistic composition of legal statutes, as well as their physical construction. Using a function and form approach, it specifically analyses the Shuihudi legal corpus. However, unlike many previous studies of Chinese legal manuscripts, which have focused on codicological issues of transcription and translation, this book considers the linguistic aspects of these manuscripts and thus their importance for understanding the development of early Chinese legal thought. Writing Chinese Laws will be useful to students and scholars of Chinese Studies, as well as Asian law and history more generally.

An Introduction to Classical Korean Literature

Author: Kichung Kim
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe
ISBN: 9780765637741
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This work provides an introduction to some of the most important and representative genres of classical Korean literature. Coverage includes: Samguk sagi and samguk yusa as literature; Kunmong and Unyongchon; the lyricism of Koryo songs; and the literature of Chosen Dynasty Women.

New Directions in Chinese Politics for the New Millennium

Author: Guoli Liu
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780773470439
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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These essays address the most significant developments in China's reform with a focus on rural and urban elections, comprehensive marketization, nature of political change, China's entry in the World Trade Organization, property rights, science and technology policy, and culture and sovereignty.

Policing Chinese Politics

Author: Michael Robert Dutton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780822334774
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the first line of his Selected Works, Mao Zedong states, "Who are our enemies, who are our friends, that is the question germane to the revolution." In Policing Chinese Politics, Michael Dutton argues that this friend/enemy dichotomy structured Chinese social order for much of the twentieth century, and the functioning of the Chinese police reflected this. Unlike western policing, which grew out of community efforts to control crime, modern Chinese policing--born in war and revolution--was founded to defend the Communist Party. Analyzing empirical evidence including extensive material from Chinese Public Security sources, Dutton tells the political history of modern China through the history of its policing practices. The deeply political character of the Chinese police was established in the 1920s, when the Communists were fighting against Chiang Kai-shek and the Nationalists. Despite being surrounded and badly outnumbered by their Nationalist enemies, the Communists dedicated themselves to self-destructive campaigns against "the enemy within"-real and imagined traitors to the Communist cause. Committing the police to ferreting out these internal enemies proved pivotal. For the next fifty years, the pursuit of "counter-revolutionary" enemies provided the governing principle of Chinese policing. This proved a surprisingly flexible mission, ranging from the political purges of the 1920s to the anti-drug and anti-prostitution sweeps of the 1950s to the prosecution of the Gang of Four and their followers in the 1970s. Dutton presents a timeline of this history in each chapter, relating political developments to contemporary policing practices. Political policing began to decline with the economic reforms of the 1970s, as policing stability replaced policing the revolutionary line. The history of the police force as a Party organ, however, continues to limit true reform.