Civilities and Civil Rights

Author: William Henry Chafe
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195029192
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Reveals how whites in Greensboro used the traditional Southern concept of civility as a means of keeping Black protest in check and how Black activists continually devised new ways of asserting their quest for freedom.

Civilities and Civil Rights

Author: William Henry Chafe
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Reveals how whites in Greensboro used the traditional Southern concept of civility as a means of keeping Black protest in check and how Black activists continually devised new ways of asserting their quest for freedom

Like a Holy Crusade

Author: Nicolaus Mills
Publisher: Ivan R Dee
ISBN: 9781566630269
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Provides an account of the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964 and the turning of the civil rights movement in America. This book recalls the triumphs of the episode and shows how the quest for racial solidarity turned divisive and laid the foundations for the black power movement.

Bayard Rustin and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Daniel Levine
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813527185
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The New Negro Artist in Paris analyzes the experiences and works of six African American artists who lived and worked in Paris during the Jazz Age sculptors Elizabeth Prophet and Augusta Savage, and painters Palmer Hayden, Hale Woodruff, Archibald J. Motley, Jr., and Albert Alexander Smith. More than 120 works of art are analyzed, many never before published. These artists exhibited the works they created in Paris at prestigious salons in France and in the United States, winning fellowships, grants, and awards. Leininger-Miller argues that it was study abroad that won these artists critical acclaim, establishing their reputations as some of the most significant leaders of the New Negro movement in the visual arts. She begins her study with a history of the debut of African American artists in Paris, 1830–1914, then provides readers with rarely seen profiles of each of the six artists from their birth through the end of their time abroad. Finally, Leininger-Miller examines patterns and differences in these individuals' backgrounds and development, their patronage in the United States and France, their shared experiences abroad, and the impact their study in Paris had on the rest of their careers.

To Redeem the Soul of America

Author: Adam Fairclough
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820323466
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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To Redeem the Soul of America looks beyond the towering figure of Martin Luther King, Jr., to disclose the full workings of the organization that supported him. As Adam Fairclough reveals the dynamics within the Southern Christian Leadership Conference he shows how Julian Bond, Jesse Jackson, Wyatt Walker, Andrew Young, and others also played a hand in the triumphs of Selma and Birmingham and the frustrations of Albany and Chicago. Joining a charismatic leader with an inspired group of activists, the SCLC built a bridge from the black proletariat to the white liberal elite and then, finally, to the halls of Congress and the White House.

Not Alms But Opportunity

Author: Touré F. Reed
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807832235
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Illuminating the class issues that shaped the racial uplift movement, Tour Reed explores the ideology and policies of the National, New York, and Chicago Urban Leagues during the first half of the twentieth century.. Reed argues that racial uplift in the

Veiled Visions

Author: David Fort Godshalk
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807876844
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1906 Atlanta, after a summer of inflammatory headlines and accusations of black-on-white sexual assaults, armed white mobs attacked African Americans, resulting in at least twenty-five black fatalities. Atlanta's black residents fought back and repeatedly defended their neighborhoods from white raids. Placing this four-day riot in a broader narrative of twentieth-century race relations in Atlanta, in the South, and in the United States, David Fort Godshalk examines the riot's origins and how memories of this cataclysmic event shaped black and white social and political life for decades to come. Nationally, the riot radicalized many civil rights leaders, encouraging W. E. B. Du Bois's confrontationist stance and diminishing the accommodationist voice of Booker T. Washington. In Atlanta, fears of continued disorder prompted white civic leaders to seek dialogue with black elites, establishing a rare biracial tradition that convinced mainstream northern whites that racial reconciliation was possible in the South without national intervention. Paired with black fears of renewed violence, however, this interracial cooperation exacerbated black social divisions and repeatedly undermined black social justice movements, leaving the city among the most segregated and socially stratified in the nation. Analyzing the interwoven struggles of men and women, blacks and whites, social outcasts and national powerbrokers, Godshalk illuminates the possibilities and limits of racial understanding and social change in twentieth-century America.