Utopias in American History

Author: Jyotsna Sreenivasan
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598840525
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
An insightful look at the long tradition of communal societies in the United States from colonial times to the present, examining their ideological foundations, daily life, and relationships to mainstream American society. * 40 entries on specific utopian communal movements in American history, from the Puritans to the Amish to single-tax movement communities * 45 entries on special topics related to utopian life, including socialism, Bible-based communism, family roles, and leadership * 25 entries on important figures, including Robert Owen and Eberhard Arnold, and events such as the Branch Davidian disaster * A comparative chronology detailing the dates of existence of the utopias covered * Bibliographical listings with each entry, leading to further investigations in print and online

Communal Utopias and the American Experience

Author: Robert P. Sutton
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275975548
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Examines utopian community building from the Ephrata Cloister (1732) to today's religious intentional communities.

America s Communal Utopias

Author: Donald E. Pitzer
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807846094
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
From the Shakers to the Branch Davidians, America's communal utopians have captured the popular imagination. Seventeen original essays here demonstrate the relevance of such groups to the mainstream of American social, religious, and economic life. The co

Heavens on Earth

Author: Mark Holloway
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486215938
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Utopian communities in American from 1680 to 1880, including the Shakers, New Harmony, Brook Farm, the Fourieristic phalanxes, and the Oneida communities, with accounts of the constitutions, revelations, beliefs, tenets, customs dictated by religious beliefs or social principle, and more.

Free Love in Utopia

Author: George Wallingford Noyes
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252026706
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
The "free love" Oneida Community, founded in New York state during the turbulent decades before the Civil War, practiced an extraordinary system of "complex marriage" as part of its sustained experiment in creating the kingdom of heaven on earth. For more than thirty years, two hundred adult members considered themselves heterosexually married to the entire community rather than to a single monogamous partner. Free Love in Utopia provides the first in-depth account of how complex marriage was introduced among previously monogamous or single Oneida Community members. Bringing together vivid, firsthand writings by members of the community--including personal correspondence, memoranda on spiritual and material concerns, and official pronouncements--this volume portrays daily life in Oneida and the deep religious commitment that permeated every aspect of it. It also presents a complex portrait of the community's founder, John Humphrey Noyes, who demanded not only complete religious loyalty from his followers but also minute control over their sexual lives. It recounts the formidable legal suits faced by the community--one of which almost forced it to disband in 1852--and the critical behind-the-scenes work of Noyes's second-in-command, John L. Miller. Most important, Free Love in Utopia describes in detail how Oneida's "enlarged family" was created and how its unorthodox practices affected its members. Key selections from a large collection of primary documents detailing Oneida's early years were compiled by George Wallingford Noyes, nephew of the founder. The present volume, astutely edited and introduced by noted communitarian scholar Lawrence Foster, marks the first publication of G. W. Noyes's remarkable manuscript, excerpted from the irreplaceable original documents that were deliberately burned after his death. The volume also reproduces Oneida's First Annual Report, which contains the sexual manifesto that underlay the community. George Wallingford Noyes (1870-1941) was a nephew of Oneida Community founder John Humphrey Noyes and the author of The Religious Experience of John Humphrey Noyes, Founder of the Onedia Community and John Humphrey Noyes: The Putney Community.

Modern American Communes

Author: Robert P. Sutton
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313321818
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Provides biographies and historical overviews of communes and utopias in the United States, discussing the beliefs, structure, and key figures in both religious and secular utopian communities.

Experimental Americans

Author: George L. Hicks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252026614
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
"Founded in 1937 by Arthur Morgan, first chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Celo (pronounced see-lo) established its own rules of land tenure and taxation, conducted its internal business by consensus and did not require its members to accept any particular ideology or religious creed. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in Celo and among its local neighbors, consultation of Celo's documentary records, and interviews with ex-members, Hicks traces the Community's ups and downs. Attacked for its opposition to World War II, Celo was revived by pacifists released from prisons and Civilian Public Service camps after the war; debilitated in the 1950s by bitter feuds with ex-members, it was buoyed up in the 1960s by the radical enthusiasm of new currents in the nation."--BOOK JACKET.

Aurora

Author: Jane Kirkpatrick
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781400074280
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
With hundreds of photographs, many historical and never-before published, this beautiful book celebrates the lives of a community that had lived out its faith in spare yet splendid ways.

Droppers

Author: Mark Matthews
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 080618308X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll. In popular imagination, these words seem to capture the atmosphere of 1960s hippie communes. Yet when the first hippie commune was founded in 1965 outside Trinidad, Colorado, the goal wasn’t one long party but rather a new society that integrated life and art. In Droppers, Mark Matthews chronicles the rise and fall of this utopian community, exploring the goals behind its creation and the factors that eventually led to its dissolution. Seeking refuge from enforced social conformity, the turmoil of racial conflict, and the Vietnam War, artist Eugene Bernofsky and other founders of Drop City sought to create an environment that would promote both equality and personal autonomy. These high ideals became increasingly hard to sustain, however, in the face of external pressures and internal divisions. In a rollicking, fast-paced style, Matthews vividly describes the early enthusiasm of Drop City’s founders, as Bernofsky and his friends constructed a town in the desert literally using the “detritus of society.” Over time, Drop City suffered from media attention, the distraction of visitors, and the arrival of new residents who didn’t share the founders’ ideals. Matthews bases his account on numerous interviews with Bernofsky and other residents as well as written sources. Explaining Drop City in the context of the counterculture’s evolution and the American tradition of utopian communities, he paints an unforgettable picture of a largely misunderstood phenomenon in American history.