Constitutional Law for a Changing America

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1506398685
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawing on political science as much as from legal studies, Constitutional Law for a Changing America helps students realize that Supreme Court cases are more than just legal names and citations. Ideal for a one-semester course, the Short Course offers all of the hallmarks of the Rights and Powers volumes in a more condensed format. The authors are known for fastidious revising and streamlining of decisions. A recipient of 12 grants from the National Science Foundation for her work on law and legal institutions, Lee Epstein has authored or co-authored over 100 articles and essays, as well as 15 books, and received the Teaching and Mentoring Award from the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association. Additionally, Thomas G. Walker is the Goodrich C. White Professor of Political Science at Emory University and co-author of A Court Divided, which won the V. O. Key, Jr. Award for the best book on southern politics.

Constitutional Law for a Changing America

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483304914
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Political factors influence judicial decisions. Arguments and input from lawyers and interest groups, the ebb and flow of public opinion, and especially the ideological and behavioral inclinations of the justices all combine to shape the development of constitutional doctrine. Drawing on political science as much as from legal studies, Constitutional Law for a Changing America helps students realize that Supreme Court cases are more than just legal names and citations. As always, Epstein and Walker account for new scholarship as well as reconsider all excerpted cases for both additions and cuts. With meticulous updating throughout, the authors feature reworked and revised discussion on: the methods of constitutional interpretation, jurisdiction stripping and standing, the appointments clause and theories of presidential power, theories of the separation-of-powers system, all cases related to the war on terrorism, theories of federalism and the current state of the federalism/commerce doctrine; in particular, linkages between chapters 6 and 7 have been made more explicit. Two important improvements in the book’s design lead to more focused and effective reading: a revamped interior layout clearly delineates between author commentary and opinion excerpts, a new “Arguments” section in the case commentary details the attorneys’ arguments for each side.

Constitutional Law for a Changing America

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483384071
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Judicial decisions are influenced by myriad political factors, from lawyers and interest groups, to the shifting sentiments of public opinion, to the ideological and behavioral inclinations of the justices. Authors Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker show how these dynamics shape the development of constitutional doctrine. Known for fastidious revising and streamlining, the authors incorporate the latest scholarship in the fields of both political science and legal studies and offer rock-solid analysis of both classic and contemporary landmark cases, including key opinions handed down through the 2015 session. Filled with supporting material—photographs of the litigants, sidebars comparing the U.S. with other nations, and "Aftermath" boxes that tell the stories of the parties' lives after the Supreme Court has acted—the text encourages greater student engagement with the material and a more complete understanding of the American constitution.

Outspoken

Author: Nan Levinson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520249974
Format: PDF
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A collection of twenty stories from the front lines of free speech captures the essence of the debate over free expression in a post-9/11 world, from a Puerto Rican journalist who is willing to risk prison to protect her sources to a fireman fighting for the right to read Playboy at work. (Current Affairs)

Reason in Law

Author: Lief Carter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317344685
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Arguing that good legal reasoning remains the best device by which we can ensure that judicial impartiality, the rule of law, and social trust and peace are preserved, Thomas F. Burke and Lief H. Carter present an accessible and lively text that analyzes the politics of the judicial process. Looking at the larger social and institutional contexts that affect the rule of law - including religious beliefs and media coverage of the courts - Reason in Law uses cases ripped from the headlines to illustrate its theory in real-world practice.

Courts Judges and Politics

Author: Lee Epstein, Dr.
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 9780072977059
Format: PDF, Docs
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This classic reader has been a best selling component of the Judicial Process/Judicial Politics/American Legal System course for years. The sixth edition has been thoroughly updated while retaining the features that made it attractive for so long: its effective structure, thorough coverage, narrative voice, choice of excerpts, and teaching flexibility.

Advice and Consent

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195345834
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From Louis Brandeis to Robert Bork to Clarence Thomas, the nomination of federal judges has generated intense political conflict. With the coming retirement of one or more Supreme Court Justices--and threats to filibuster lower court judges--the selection process is likely to be, once again, the center of red-hot partisan debate. In Advice and Consent, two leading legal scholars, Lee Epstein and Jeffrey A. Segal, offer a brief, illuminating Baedeker to this highly important procedure, discussing everything from constitutional background, to crucial differences in the nomination of judges and justices, to the role of the Judiciary Committee in vetting nominees. Epstein and Segal shed light on the role played by the media, by the American Bar Association, and by special interest groups (whose efforts helped defeat Judge Bork). Though it is often assumed that political clashes over nominees are a new phenomenon, the authors argue that the appointment of justices and judges has always been a highly contentious process--one largely driven by ideological and partisan concerns. The reader discovers how presidents and the senate have tried to remake the bench, ranging from FDR's controversial "court packing" scheme to the Senate's creation in 1978 of 35 new appellate and 117 district court judgeships, allowing the Democrats to shape the judiciary for years. The authors conclude with possible "reforms," from the so-called nuclear option, whereby a majority of the Senate could vote to prohibit filibusters, to the even more dramatic suggestion that Congress eliminate a judge's life tenure either by term limits or compulsory retirement. With key appointments looming on the horizon, Advice and Consent provides everything concerned citizens need to know to understand the partisan rows that surround the judicial nominating process.