Deaf People in Hitler s Europe

Author: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563681325
Format: PDF
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Inspired by the conference “Deaf People in Hitler's Europe, 1933–1945,” hosted jointly by Gallaudet University and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 1998, this extraordinary collection, organized into three parts, integrates key presentations and important postconference research. Henry Friedlander begins “Part I: Racial Hygiene” by analyzing the assault on deaf people and people with disabilities as an integral element in the Nazi attempt to implement their theories of racial hygiene. Robert Proctor documents the role of medical professionals in deciding who should be sterilized or forbidden to marry, and whom the Nazi authorities would murder. In an essay written especially for this volume, Patricia Heberer details how Nazi manipulation of eugenics theory and practice facilitated the justification for the murder of those considered socially undesirable. “Part II: The German Experience” commences with Jochen Muhs's interviews of deaf Berliners who lived under Nazi rule, both those who suffered abuse and those who, as members of the Nazi Party, persecuted others, especially deaf Jews. John S. Schuchman describes the remarkable 1932 film Misjudged People, which so successfully portrayed the German deaf community as a vibrant contributor to society that the Nazis banned its showing when they came to power. Horst Biesold's contribution confirms the complicity of teachers who denounced their own students, labeling them hereditarily deaf and thus exposing them to compulsory sterilization. The section also includes the reprint of a chilling 1934 article entitled “The Place of the School for the Deaf in the New Reich,” in which author Kurt Lietz rued the expense of educating deaf students, who could not become soldiers or bear “healthy children.” In “Part III: The Jewish Deaf Experience,” John S. Schuchman discusses the plight of deaf Jews in Hungary. His historical analysis is complemented by a chapter containing excerpts from the testimony of six deaf Jewish survivors who describe their personal ordeals. Peter Black's reflections on the need for more research conclude this vital study of a little-known chapter of the Holocaust.

Surviving in Silence

Author: Eleanor C. Dunai
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563681196
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Izrael Zachariah Deutsch was born on March 15, 1934, in Komjata, Czechoslovakia. The second youngest child, Izrael lived a bucolic existence with nine brothers and sisters on a farm, differing from them only in that he was deaf. When he was six, his mother took him to Budapest, Hungary, and enrolled him in a Jewish school for deaf children, where he thrived. Soon, however, the Nazi regime in Germany and the Arrow Cross fascists in Hungary destroyed Izrael's world forever. Izrael realized that by being both Jewish and deaf, he faced a double threat of being exported to the gas chambers in Poland. But at every lethal junction, he found a way to survive, first by buying and reselling pastries for extra money that later saved his life in the Budapest ghetto. Still, Izrael was close to death from starvation when he was liberated by Russian soldiers on January 18, 1945. Izrael survived the war only to learn that his parents and two brothers had been murdered by the Nazis. The rest of his brothers and sisters scattered to distant parts of the world. Forced to remain in Budapest, Izrael finished school and became an accomplished machinist. He avoided any part in the Hungarian uprising in 1956 so that he could secure a visa to leave for Sweden. From Sweden he traveled throughout Europe and Israel, using an amazing network of Holocaust survivors, relatives, and deaf friends to ease his journey. He finally settled in Los Angeles, where he married a deaf Jewish woman he had met years before. Along the way, he changed his name from Izrael Deutsch to Harry Dunai.

Never the Twain Shall Meet

Author: Richard Winefield
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680564
Format: PDF, Docs
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Throughout the last two centuries, a controversial question has plagued the field of education of the deaf: Should sign language be used to communicate with and instruct deaf children? Never the Twain Shall Meet focuses on the debate over this question, especially as it was waged in the 19th century, when it was at its highest pitch and the battle lines were clearly drawn. In addition to exploring Alexander Graham Bells and Edward Miner Gallaudets familial and educational backgrounds, Never the Twain Shall Meet looks at how their views of society affected their philosophies of education and how their work continues to influence the education of deaf students today.

Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language

Author: Nora Ellen GROCE
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067450397X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From the seventeenth century to the early years of the twentieth, the population of Martha’s Vineyard manifested an extremely high rate of profound hereditary deafness. In stark contrast to the experience of most deaf people in our own society, the Vineyarders who were born deaf were so thoroughly integrated into the daily life of the community that they were not seen—and did not see themselves—as handicapped or as a group apart. Deaf people were included in all aspects of life, such as town politics, jobs, church affairs, and social life. How was this possible? On the Vineyard, hearing and deaf islanders alike grew up speaking sign language. This unique sociolinguistic adaptation meant that the usual barriers to communication between the hearing and the deaf, which so isolate many deaf people today, did not exist.

Hollywood Speaks

Author: John S. Schuchman
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252068508
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Absorbing, scholarly study of the portrayal in nearly 200 movies and TV episodes of the least visible disabled group in American society. Includes the first filmography (annotated) of films designed for general audiences that deal with deafness or include a deaf character in a mator or pivotal role. For all film study collections. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Crying Hands

Author: Horst Biesold
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680779
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Now available in paperback; ISBN 1-56368-255-9

Deaf People and Society

Author: Irene W. Leigh
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1315473801
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Deaf People and Society incorporates multiple perspectives related to the topics of psychology, education, and sociology, including the viewpoints of deaf adults themselves. In doing so, it considers the implications of what it means to be deaf or hard of hearing and how deaf adults’ lives are impacted by decisions that professionals make, whether in the clinic, the school, or when working with family. This second edition has been thoroughly revised and offers current perspectives on the following topics: Etiologies of deafness and the identification process The role of auditory access Cognition, language, communication, and literacy Bilingual, bilingual/bimodal, and monolingual approaches to language learning Educational, legal, and placement aspects Childhood psychological issues Psychological and sociological viewpoints of deaf adults The criminal justice system and deaf people Psychodynamics of interaction between deaf and hearing people Each chapter begins with a set of objectives and concludes with suggested readings for further research. This edition contains 10 new and original case studies, including ones on hearing children of deaf adults, sudden hearing loss, a young deaf adult with mental illness, and more. Written by a seasoned deaf/hearing bilingual team, this unique text continues to be the go-to resource for students and future professionals interested in working with deaf and hard-of-hearing persons.

Deaf Subjects

Author: Brenda Jo Brueggemann
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814799671
Format: PDF, Docs
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Viewpoints contains challenging essays on Freud, his fellows and critics, and on the contribution of modern figures such as Bruno Bettelheim, Thomas Azasz and Eric Berne. Charles Rycroft also pursues his enduring fascination with the place of memory and imagination in the work of artists and writers , such as Wilkie Collins, Rousseau and Sartre, and finally explores our puzzled conceptions of self hood and self awareness. Fluent, entertaining, imaginative and thought provoking, this collection confirms Rycroft as one of the most humane as well as the most distinguished of British psychoanalysts.

The Boy at the Top of the Mountain

Author: John Boyne
Publisher: Penguin Group
ISBN: 0385687729
Format: PDF
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The powerful, unforgettable new novel from the bestselling author of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, for ages 12+. When Pierrot becomes an orphan, he must leave his home in Paris for a new life with his Aunt Beatrix, a servant in a wealthy household at the top of the German mountains. But this is no ordinary time, for it is 1935 and the Second World War is fast approaching; and this is no ordinary house, for this is the Berghof, the home of Adolf Hitler. Quickly, Pierrot is taken under Hitler's wing, and is thrown into an increasingly dangerous new world: a world of terror, secrets and betrayal, from which he may never be able to escape.

In the Garden of Beasts

Author: Erik Larson
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780307887955
Format: PDF, ePub
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Erik Larson, New York Times bestselling author of Devil in the White City, delivers a remarkable story set during Hitler’s rise to power. The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E. Dodd becomes America’s first ambassador to Hitler’s Nazi Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history. A mild-mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha. At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich with their infectious enthusiasm for restoring Germany to a position of world prominence. Enamored of the “New Germany,” she has one affair after another, including with the suprisingly honorable first chief of the Gestapo, Rudolf Diels. But as evidence of Jewish persecution mounts, confirmed by chilling first-person testimony, her father telegraphs his concerns to a largely indifferent State Department back home. Dodd watches with alarm as Jews are attacked, the press is censored, and drafts of frightening new laws begin to circulate. As that first year unfolds and the shadows deepen, the Dodds experience days full of excitement, intrigue, romance—and ultimately, horror, when a climactic spasm of violence and murder reveals Hitler’s true character and ruthless ambition. Suffused with the tense atmosphere of the period, and with unforgettable portraits of the bizarre Göring and the expectedly charming--yet wholly sinister--Goebbels, In the Garden of Beasts lends a stunning, eyewitness perspective on events as they unfold in real time, revealing an era of surprising nuance and complexity. The result is a dazzling, addictively readable work that speaks volumes about why the world did not recognize the grave threat posed by Hitler until Berlin, and Europe, were awash in blood and terror.