Gendered Epidemic

Author: Nancy L. Roth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136673326
Format: PDF, Docs
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First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

Author: Cheris Kramarae
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135963150
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.

Women Take Care

Author: Katie Hogan
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Self-sacrificing mothers and forgiving wives, caretaking lesbians, and vigilant maternal surrogates--these "good women" are all familiar figures in the visual and print culture relating to AIDS. In a probing critique of that culture, Katie Hogan demonstrates ways in which literary and popular works use the classic image of the nurturing female to render "queer" AIDS more acceptable, while consigning women to conventional roles and reinforcing the idea that everyone with this disease is somehow suspect.In times of crisis, the figure of the idealized woman who is modest and selfless has repeatedly surfaced in Western culture as a balm and a source of comfort--and as a means of mediating controversial issues. Drawing on examples from journalism, medical discourse, fiction, drama, film, television, and documentaries, Hogan describes how texts on AIDS reproduce this historically entrenched paradigm of sacrifice and care, a paradigm that reinforces biases about race and sexuality. Hogan believes that the growing nostalgia for women's traditional roles has deflected attention away from women's own health needs. Throughout her book, she depicts caretaking as a fundamental human obligation, but one that currently falls primarily to those members of society with the least power. Only by rejecting the stereotype of the "good woman," she says, can Americans begin to view caretaking as the responsibility of the entire society.

Representations of HIV and AIDS

Author: Gabriele Griffin
Publisher:
ISBN:
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This text asks whatever happened to the plague that seemed so threatening in the early 1980s, resulting in highly visible public interventions such as the posters of the health promotions campaigns and mainstream films like Philadelphia. The book argues that the explosion of HIV/AIDS into highly visible cultural forms, such as Hollywood movies, leaflet drops, theatre, activist interventions and art from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s, has been followed by its renewed invisible status. Griffin suggests that changes in the understanding of HIV/AIDS, the shift from dying of to living with in Western cultures, and a failure to grasp the full extent of the growth and impact of HIV/AIDS in a number of African and Asian countries, has led to the death of the disease in the Western media. The othering of HIV/AIDS has made representation at the cultural and at the political level problematic, relegating the continued epidemic proportions to the backpage of the news media and ignoring or shrouding the havoc HIV/AIDS is still wreaking.

Love Money and HIV

Author: Sanyu A. Mojola
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520280938
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How do modern women in developing countries experience sexuality and love? Drawing on a rich array of interview, ethnographic, and survey data from her native country of Kenya, Sanyu A. Mojola examines how young African women, who suffer disproportionate rates of HIV infection compared to young African men, navigate their relationships, schooling, employment, and finances in the context of economic inequality and a devastating HIV epidemic. Writing from a unique outsider-insider perspective, Mojola argues that the entanglement of love, money, and the transformation of girls into “consuming women” lies at the heart of women’s coming-of-age and health crises. At once engaging and compassionate, this text is an incisive analysis of gender, sexuality, and health in Africa.