Gospel Tracks Through Texas

Author: Wilma Rugh Taylor
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585444342
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A ministry to railroad men and their families lay at the heart of chapel car work, which over a period of fifty years saw thirteen rail chapel cars minister to thousands of towns, mainly west of the Mississippi. Author Wilma Rugh Taylor's portrayal of this ministry for the one car, Good Will, which served Texas, provides a view of life in towns such as Denison, Texline, Marshall, San Antonio, Laredo, Abilene, and Dalhart. The railroads that carried the Texas chapel car included the Texas & Pacific; the Missouri, Kansas & Topeka; the Southern Pacific; the International & Great Northern; and the Mexican International.

This Train is Bound for Glory

Author: Wilma Rugh Taylor
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This remarkable story of the chapel cars that traveled the American West from 1890 to 1940 reveals previously untapped sources to complete the history of all thirteen cars.

Usable pasts

Author: Tad Tuleja
Publisher: Utah State Univ Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Fourteen authors examine the traditional expressions of a variety of groups from the U.S. and Canada who continually reinvent their identities as usable pasts.

Biomedical Communications

Author: Jon D. Miller
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080528083
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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With data from the United States and Europe, Jon Miller and Linda Kimmel examine the public's understanding of and attitude toward biotechnology and biomedicine while they present methods of introducing cutting edge science to the nonscientist. Biomedical Communications illustrates how vital it is for researchers, journalists, and policy makers to clearly communicate their findings in a way that avoids general misconception or confusion. The authors explore how to acquire information about biomedical policy, discuss strategies for informing consumers, and present tactics for improving biomedical communication with the public. Using Research to Improve Biomedical Communications The Public Understanding of Biomedical Science Strategies for Communications to Consumers Public Attitudes Toward Biotechnology Issues

New Deal Cowboy

Author: Michael Duchemin
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806156716
Format: PDF, ePub
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Best known to Americans as the “singing cowboy,” beloved entertainer Gene Autry (1907–1998) appeared in countless films, radio broadcasts, television shows, and other venues. While Autry’s name and a few of his hit songs are still widely known today, his commitment to political causes and public diplomacy deserves greater appreciation. In this innovative examination of Autry’s influence on public opinion, Michael Duchemin explores the various platforms this cowboy crooner used to support important causes, notably Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal and foreign policy initiatives leading up to World War II. As a prolific performer of western folk songs and country-western music, Autry gained popularity in the 1930s by developing a persona that appealed to rural, small-town, and newly urban fans. It was during this same time, Duchemin explains, that Autry threw his support behind the thirty-second president of the United States. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, Duchemin demonstrates how Autry popularized Roosevelt’s New Deal policies and made them more attractive to the American public. In turn, the president used the emerging motion picture industry as an instrument of public diplomacy to enhance his policy agendas, which Autry’s films, backed by Republic Pictures, unabashedly endorsed. As the United States inched toward entry into World War II, the president’s focus shifted toward foreign policy. Autry responded by promoting Americanism, war preparedness, and friendly relations with Latin America. As a result, Duchemin argues, “Sergeant Gene Autry” played a unique role in making FDR’s internationalist policies more palatable for American citizens reluctant to engage in another foreign war. New Deal Cowboy enhances our understanding of Gene Autry as a western folk hero who, during critical times of economic recovery and international crisis, readily assumed the role of public diplomat, skillfully using his talents to persuade a marginalized populace to embrace a nationalist agenda. By drawing connections between western popular culture and American political history, the book also offers valuable insight concerning the development of leisure and western tourism, the information industry, public diplomacy, and foreign policy in twentieth-century America.

Yeomen Sharecroppers and Socialists

Author: Kyle Grant Wilkison
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603444130
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As the nineteenth century ended in Hunt County, Texas, a way of life was dying. The tightly knit, fiercely independent society of the yeomen farmers--"plain folk," as historians have often dubbed them--was being swallowed up by the rising tide of a rapidly changing, cotton-based economy. A social network based on family, religion, and community was falling prey to crippling debt and resulting loss of land ownership. For many of the rural people of Hunt County and similar places, it seemed like the end of the world. In Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists historian Kyle G. Wilkison analyzes the patterns of plain-folk life and the changes that occurred during the critical four decades spanning the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. Political protest evolved in the wake of the devastating losses experienced by the poor rural majority, and Wilkison carefully explores the interplay of religion and politics as Greenbackers, Populists, and Socialists vied for the support of the dispossessed tenant farmers and sharecroppers. With its richly drawn contextualization and analysis of the causes and effects of the epochal shifts in plain-folk society, Kyle G. Wilkison's Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists will reward students and scholars in economic, regional, and agricultural history.

A Bad Year for Tomatoes

Author: John Patrick
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc
ISBN: 9780822200895
Format: PDF, ePub
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THE STORY: Fed up with the pressures and demands of her acting career, the famous Myra Marlowe leases a house in the tiny New England hamlet of Beaver Haven and settles down to write her autobiography. She is successful in turning aside the offers

Amarillo

Author: Christine Wyly
Publisher: Hpn Books
ISBN: 9781935377870
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A full-color photojournal showcasing contemporary photography of Amarillo, Texas, and the histories of

First Timers and Old Timers

Author: Kenneth L. Untiedt
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574414712
Format: PDF, Mobi
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“The Texas Folklore Society has been alive and kicking for over one hundred years now, and I don't really think there's any mystery as to what keeps the organization going strong. The secret to our longevity is simply the constant replenishment of our body of contributors. We are especially fortunate in recent years to have had papers given at our annual meetings by new members—young members, many of whom are college or even high school students. “These presentations are oftentimes given during sessions right alongside some of our oldest members. We've also had long-time members who've been around for years but had never yet given papers; thankfully, they finally took the opportunity to present their research, fulfilling the mission of the TFS: to collect, preserve, and present the lore of Texas and the Southwest. “You'll find in this book some of the best articles from those presentations. The first fruits of our youngest or newest members include Acayla Haile on the folklore of plants. Familiar and well-respected names like J. Rhett Rushing and Kenneth W. Davis discuss folklore about monsters and the classic 'widow's revenge' tale. These works—and the people who produced them—represent the secret behind the history of the Texas Folklore Society, as well as its future.”—Kenneth L. Untiedt