Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190643544
Format: PDF, ePub
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Deaf children are not hearing children who can't hear, and having a deaf child is not analogous to having a hearing child who can't hear. Beyond any specific effects of hearing loss, deaf children are far more diverse than their hearing age-mates. A lack of access to language, limited incidental learning and social interactions, as well as the possibility of secondary disabilities, mean that deaf children face a variety of challenges in language, social, and academic domains. In recent years, technological innovations such as digital hearing aids and cochlear implants have improved hearing and the possibility of spoken language for many deaf learners, but parents, teachers, and other professionals are just now coming to recognize the cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing children. Sign languages and schools and programs for deaf learners thus remain an important part of the continuum of services needed for this population. Understanding the unique strengths and needs of deaf children is the key. Now in its third edition, Marc Marschark's Raising and Educating a Deaf Child, which has helped a countless number of families, offers a comprehensively clear, evidence-based guide to the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by parents and teachers of deaf children today.

Reading and Deafness Theory Research and Practice

Author: Beverly J Trezek
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1111803536
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This first-of-its-kind text connects theories and research with classroom practice to provide a comprehensive and balanced view of reading and deafness that addresses a broad scope of literacy concepts. An excellent classroom resource, the text offers current and future deaf educators with research-based reading instructional practices and techniques for implementing these strategies with students. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children

Author: Connie Christine Mayer
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199965692
Format: PDF, ePub
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There is a robust body of knowledge suggesting that early language and literacy experiences significantly impact on future academic achievement. In contrast, relatively little has been written with respect to the early literacy development and experiences of deaf children. In Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children, Connie Mayer and Beverly J. Trezek seek to fill this gap by providing an in-depth exploration of how young deaf children learn to read and write, identifying the foundational knowledge, abilities, and skills that are fundamental to this process. They provide an overview of the latest research and present a model of early literacy development to guide their discussion on topics such as teaching reading and writing, curriculum and interventions, bilingualism, and assessment. Throughout, they concentrate on the ways in which young learners with hearing loss are similar to, or different from, their hearing age peers and the consequent implications for research and practice. Their discussion is wide-reaching, as they focus on children from various cultural and linguistic backgrounds, those with additional disabilities and hearing losses ranging from mild to profound, and those using a range of communication modalities and amplification technologies, including cochlear implants. With the implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and advancements in hearing technologies that have heightened both the emphasis on literacy development in the early years and the importance of these years in the ultimate development of age-appropriate reading and reading outcomes, this timely text addresses a topic that has thus far eluded the field.

Evidence Based Practice in Educating Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Author: Patricia Elizabeth Spencer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199780112
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Debates about methods of supporting language development and academic skills of deaf or hard-of-hearing children have waxed and waned for more than 100 years: Will using sign language interfere with learning to use spoken language or does it offer optimal access to communication for deaf children? Does placement in classrooms with mostly hearing children enhance or impede academic and social-emotional development? Will cochlear implants or other assistive listening devices provide deaf children with sufficient input for age-appropriate reading abilities? Are traditional methods of classroom teaching effective for deaf and hard-of-hearing students? Although there is a wealth of evidence with regard to each of these issues, too often, decisions on how to best support deaf and hard-of-hearing children in developing language and academic skills are made based on incorrect or incomplete information. No matter how well-intentioned, decisions grounded in opinions, beliefs, or value judgments are insufficient to guide practice. Instead, we need to take advantage of relevant, emerging research concerning best practices and outcomes in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing learners. In this critical evaluation of what we know and what we do not know about educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students, the authors examine a wide range of educational settings and research methods that have guided deaf education in recent years--or should. The book provides a focus for future educational and research efforts, and aims to promote optimal support for deaf and hard-of-hearing learners of all ages. Co-authored by two of the most respected leaders in the field, this book summarizes and evaluates research findings across multiple disciplines pertaining to the raising and educating of deaf children, providing a comprehensive but concise record of the successes, failures, and unanswered questions in deaf education. A readily accessible and invaluable source for teachers, university students, and other professionals, Evidence-Based Practice in Educating Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students encourages readers to reconsider assumptions and delve more deeply into what we really know about deaf and hard-of-hearing children, their patterns of development, and their lifelong learning.

Diversity in Deaf Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190493070
Format: PDF
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Deaf children are not hearing children who can't hear. Beyond any specific effects of hearing loss, as a group they are far more diverse than hearing peers. Lack of full access to language, incidental learning, and social interactions as well as the possibility of secondary disabilities means that deaf learners face a variety of challenges in academic domains. Technological innovations such as digital hearing aids and cochlear implants have improved hearing and the possibility of spoken language for many deaf learners, but parents, teachers, and other professionals are just now coming to recognize that there are cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing students likely to affect academic outcomes. Sign languages and schools and programs for deaf learners thus remain an important part of the continuum of services needed for this diverse population. Understanding such diversity and determining ways in which to accommodate them must become a top priority in educating deaf learners. Through the participation of an international, interdisciplinary set of scholars, Diversity in Deaf Education takes a broad view of learning and academic progress, considering "the whole child" in the context of the families, languages, educational settings in which they are immersed. In adopting this perspective, the complexities and commonalities in the social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic mosaic of which the deaf child is a part, are captured. It is only through such a holistic consideration of diverse children developing within diverse settings that we can understand their academic potentials.

Language and Literacy Development in Children who are Deaf

Author: Barbara R. Schirmer
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The second edition of Language and Literacy Development in Children Who are Deaf provides the most current information about teaching language, reading, and writing to deaf children. Models and strategies are clearly described and supported by theory, current research, and numerous examples of how these models and strategies can be used in classrooms with deaf students. The book has been reorganized so teachers can easily follow how to assess a deaf child's current abilities in language and literacy, develop appropriate instructional goals, and choose from among a variety of effective teaching models and strategies. The second edition discusses issues related to American Sign Language, bilingual education techniques, incorporating technology into instruction, and developing balanced literacy programs for deaf children. Experienced teachers, novice teachers, and individuals becoming teachers of deaf children can use this information to develop a comprehensive language and literacy program for deaf students from preschool through high school. For anyone who teaches reading or language to deaf children, or who is involved in literacy development of deaf children.