Speaking of Race and Class

Author: Elizabeth Aries
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781439909669
Format: PDF, ePub
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In "Speaking of Race and Class," the follow-up volume to her groundbreaking "Race and Class Matters at an Elite College," Elizabeth Aries completes her four-year study of diversity at a prestigious liberal arts college. Here, the 58 studentsOCoaffluent, lower-income, black, and whiteOCothat Aries has interviewed since they were Amherst freshmen provide a complete picture of what and how each group learned about issues of race and class. Aries presents the studentsOCO personal perceptions of their experiences. She reveals the extent to which learning from diversity takes place on campus, and examines the distinct challenges that arise for students living in this heterogeneous community. Aries also looks more broadly at how colleges and universities across the country are addressing the challenges surrounding diversity. "Speaking of Race and Class" testifies to the programming and practices that have proven successful.

No Longer Separate Not Yet Equal

Author: Thomas J. Espenshade
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400831531
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Against the backdrop of today's increasingly multicultural society, are America's elite colleges admitting and successfully educating a diverse student body? No Longer Separate, Not Yet Equal pulls back the curtain on the selective college experience and takes a rigorous and comprehensive look at how race and social class impact each stage--from application and admission, to enrollment and student life on campus. Arguing that elite higher education contributes to both social mobility and inequality, the authors investigate such areas as admission advantages for minorities, academic achievement gaps tied to race and class, unequal burdens in paying for tuition, and satisfaction with college experiences. The book's analysis is based on data provided by the National Survey of College Experience, collected from more than nine thousand students who applied to one of ten selective colleges between the early 1980s and late 1990s. The authors explore the composition of applicant pools, factoring in background and "selective admission enhancement strategies"--including AP classes, test-prep courses, and extracurriculars--to assess how these strengthen applications. On campus, the authors examine roommate choices, friendship circles, and degrees of social interaction, and discover that while students from different racial and class circumstances are not separate in college, they do not mix as much as one might expect. The book encourages greater interaction among student groups and calls on educational institutions to improve access for students of lower socioeconomic status. No Longer Separate, Not Yet Equal offers valuable insights into the intricate workings of America's elite higher education system.

The Challenge of Independent Colleges

Author: Christopher C. Morphew
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421424320
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book began as a collaboration among top higher education researchers, the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) scholars, and the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC). Documenting the challenges and opportunities facing independent colleges in several integral areas, including public purposes and student engagement, The Challenge of Independent Colleges is informed by the reactions of independent campus presidents and provosts who work every day to act on the opportunities presented by private colleges and universities. Each of the nine chapters is written by a leading higher education scholar and frames highly relevant issues for administrators at independent colleges and universities. Topics range from "Access and Affordability" and "Assessment" to "Ensuring Student Success" and "Institutional Strategy." Each chapter is followed by a short, critical reaction written by a provost or president at a CIC member institution. These reactions demonstrate how the information contained in the chapter might be used by institutional leaders to make decisions and what other information on the chapter’s topic might be useful for leaders at independent colleges and universities. An important resource for higher education scholars and campus leaders, this text will also be a useful addition to courses on education. Contributors: John M. Braxton, Erin B. Ciarimboli, Cynthia Cogswell, Valerie Crespín-Trujillo, Daniel Custer, Richard Dorman, Roger Drake, Richard Ekman, David Guthrie, Harold V. Hartley III, James C. Hearn, Nicholas Hillman, Jillian Kinzie, Mary B. Marcy, Matthew J. Mayhew, Charlie McCormick, Linda McMillin, Christopher C. Morphew, Julie J. Park, Laura W. Perna, Kevin M. Ross, Marc Roy, Laurie Schreiner, Carolyn J. Stefanco, Barrett Taylor, Stephen J. Vassallo, David J. Weerts, Cynthia A. Wells, Letha Zook

Where We Stand

Author: bell hooks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135956642
Format: PDF, Docs
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Drawing on both her roots in Kentucky and her adventures with Manhattan Coop boards, Where We Stand is a successful black woman's reflection--personal, straight forward, and rigorously honest--on how our dilemmas of class and race are intertwined, and how we can find ways to think beyond them.

Inside the College Gates

Author: Jenny M. Stuber, University of North Florida, author of "Inside the College Gates: How Class and Culture Matter in Higher Education"
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739149003
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is intended to bring greater nuance to the study of inequality and higher education. Rather than focusing on human capital and students' experiences inside the classroom, the author highlights the ways in which the experiential core of college life-the social and extra-curricular worlds of higher education-operates as a setting in which social class inequalities manifest and get reproduced.

Class and Campus Life

Author: Elizabeth M. Lee
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501703889
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In 2015, the New York Times reported, "The bright children of janitors and nail salon workers, bus drivers and fast-food cooks may not have grown up with the edifying vacations, museum excursions, daily doses of NPR and prep schools that groom Ivy applicants, but they are coveted candidates for elite campuses." What happens to academically talented but economically challenged "first-gen" students when they arrive on campus? Class markers aren't always visible from a distance, but socioeconomic differences permeate campus life—and the inner experiences of students—in real and sometimes unexpected ways. In Class and Campus Life, Elizabeth M. Lee shows how class differences are enacted and negotiated by students, faculty, and administrators at an elite liberal arts college for women located in the Northeast. Using material from two years of fieldwork and more than 140 interviews with students, faculty, administrators, and alumnae at the pseudonymous Linden College, Lee adds depth to our understanding of inequality in higher education. An essential part of her analysis is to illuminate the ways in which the students' and the college’s practices interact, rather than evaluating them separately, as seemingly unrelated spheres. She also analyzes underlying moral judgments brought to light through cultural connotations of merit, hard work by individuals, and making it on your own that permeate American higher education. Using students’ own descriptions and understandings of their experiences to illustrate the complexity of these issues, Lee shows how the lived experience of socioeconomic difference is often defined in moral, as well as economic, terms, and that tensions, often unspoken, undermine students’ senses of belonging.

Learning to Speak Learning to Listen

Author: Susan E. Chase
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801476211
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"This book about diversity offers a fresh perspective and is an important reminder to all that context matters, and what we say and do (our narrative practices) shape and are shaped by it."—Susan Murphy, Cornell University

Privilege

Author: Ross Gregory Douthat
Publisher: Hyperion
ISBN: 9781401307554
Format: PDF, ePub
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Now in paperback, the penetrating critique of elite universities and the culture of privilege they perpetuate Ross Gregory Douthat arrived at Harvard University in the fall of 1998 carrying an idealized vision of Ivy League life. But the Harvard of his dreams, an institution fueled by intellectual curiosity and entrusted with the keys to liberal education, never materialized. Instead, he found himself in a school rife with elitism and moneyed excess, an incubator for the grasping and ambitious, a college seduced by the religion of success. So Douthat was educated at Harvard, but what Harvard taught him was not what he had gone there to learn. Instead, he was immersed in the culture of America's ever-swelling ruling class -- a culture of privilege, of ambition and entitlement, in which a vast network of elite schools are viewed by students, parents, administrators, and professors more as stepping-stones to high salaries and coveted social networks than as institutions entrusted with academic excellence. Privilege is a powerfully rendered portrait of a young manhood, a pointed social critique of this country's most esteemed institutions, and an exploration of issues such as affirmative action, grade inflation, political correctness, and curriculum reform.

The Diversity Bargain

Author: Natasha K. Warikoo
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022640028X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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We’ve heard plenty from politicians and experts on affirmative action and higher education, about how universities should intervene—if at all—to ensure a diverse but deserving student population. But what about those for whom these issues matter the most? In this book, Natasha K. Warikoo deeply explores how students themselves think about merit and race at a uniquely pivotal moment: after they have just won the most competitive game of their lives and gained admittance to one of the world’s top universities. What Warikoo uncovers—talking with both white students and students of color at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford—is absolutely illuminating; and some of it is positively shocking. As she shows, many elite white students understand the value of diversity abstractly, but they ignore the real problems that racial inequality causes and that diversity programs are meant to solve. They stand in fear of being labeled a racist, but they are quick to call foul should a diversity program appear at all to hamper their own chances for advancement. The most troubling result of this ambivalence is what she calls the “diversity bargain,” in which white students reluctantly agree with affirmative action as long as it benefits them by providing a diverse learning environment—racial diversity, in this way, is a commodity, a selling point on a brochure. And as Warikoo shows, universities play a big part in creating these situations. The way they talk about race on campus and the kinds of diversity programs they offer have a huge impact on student attitudes, shaping them either toward ambivalence or, in better cases, toward more productive and considerate understandings of racial difference. Ultimately, this book demonstrates just how slippery the notions of race, merit, and privilege can be. In doing so, it asks important questions not just about college admissions but what the elite students who have succeeded at it—who will be the world’s future leaders—will do with the social inequalities of the wider world.