Radio Utopia

Author: Matthew C. Ehrlich
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252093003
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As World War II drew to a close and radio news was popularized through overseas broadcasting, journalists and dramatists began to build upon the unprecedented success of war reporting on the radio by creating audio documentaries. Focusing particularly on the work of radio luminaries such as Edward R. Murrow, Fred Friendly, Norman Corwin, and Erik Barnouw, Radio Utopia: Postwar Audio Documentary in the Public Interest traces this crucial phase in American radio history, significant not only for its timing immediately before television, but also because it bridges the gap between the end of the World Wars and the beginning of the Cold War. Matthew C. Ehrlich closely examines the production of audio documentaries disseminated by major American commercial broadcast networks CBS, NBC, and ABC from 1945 to 1951. Audio documentary programs educated Americans about juvenile delinquency, slums, race relations, venereal disease, atomic energy, arms control, and other issues of public interest, but they typically stopped short of calling for radical change. Drawing on rare recordings and scripts, Ehrlich traces a crucial phase in the evolution of news documentary, as docudramas featuring actors were supplanted by reality-based programs that took advantage of new recording technology. Paralleling that shift from drama to realism was a shift in liberal thought from dreams of world peace to uneasy adjustments to a cold war mentality. Influenced by corporate competition and government regulations, radio programming reflected shifts in a range of political thought that included pacifism, liberalism, and McCarthyism. In showing how programming highlighted contradictions within journalism and documentary, Radio Utopia reveals radio's response to the political, economic, and cultural upheaval of the post-war era.

Saving the World

Author: Emile G. McAnany
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252093876
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This far-reaching and long overdue chronicle of communication for development from a leading scholar in the field presents in-depth policy analyses to outline a vision for how communication technologies can impact social change and improve human lives. Drawing on the pioneering works of Daniel Lerner, Everett Rogers, and Wilbur Schramm as well as his own personal experiences in the field, Emile G. McAnany builds a new, historically cognizant paradigm for the future that supplements technology with social entrepreneurship. McAnany summarizes the history of the field of communication for development and social change from Truman's Marshall Plan for the Third World to the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals. Part history and part policy analysis, Saving the World argues that the communication field can renew its role in development by recognizing large aid-giving institutions have a difficult time promoting genuine transformation. McAnany suggests an agenda for improving and strengthening the work of academics, policy makers, development funders, and any others who use communication in all of its forms to foster social change.

Becoming the Story

Author: Lindsay Palmer
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252050223
Format: PDF
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The September 11 attacks produced changes in journalism and the lives of the people who practiced it. Foreign reporters felt surrounded by the hate of American colleagues for "the enemy." Americans in combat areas became literal targets of anti-U.S. sentiment. Behind the lines, editors and bureau chiefs scrambled to reorient priorities while feeling the pressure of sending others into danger. Becoming the Story examines the transformation of war reporting in the decade after 9/11. Lindsay Palmer delves into times when print or television correspondents themselves received intense public scrutiny because of an incident associated with the work of war reporting. Such instances include Daniel Pearl's kidnapping and murder; Bob Woodruff's near-fatal injury in Iraq; the expulsions of Maziar Bahari and Nazila Fathi from Iran in 2009; the sexual assault of Lara Logan; and Marie Colvin's 2012 death in Syria. Merging analysis with in-depth interviews of Woodruff and others, Palmer shows what these events say about how post-9/11 conflicts transformed the day-to-day labor of reporting. But they also illuminate how journalists' work became entangled with issues ranging from digitization processes to unprecedented hostility from all sides to the political logic of the War on Terror.

Across the Waves

Author: Derek W Vaillant
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252050010
Format: PDF, Docs
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In 1931, the United States and France embarked on a broadcasting partnership built around radio. Over time, the transatlantic sonic alliance came to personify and to shape American-French relations in an era of increased global media production and distribution. Drawing on a broad range of American and French archives, Derek Vaillant joins textual and aural materials with original data analytics and maps to illuminate U.S.-French broadcasting's political and cultural development. Vaillant focuses on the period from 1931 until France dismantled its state media system in 1974. His analysis examines mobile actors, circulating programs, and shifting governmental and other institutions shaping international radio's use in times of war and peace. He explores the extraordinary achievements, the miscommunications and failures, and the limits of cooperation between America and France as they shaped a new media environment. Throughout, Vaillant explains how radio's power as an instantaneous mass communications tool produced, legitimized, and circulated various notions of states, cultures, ideologies, and peoples as superior or inferior.

America s Battle for Media Democracy

Author: Victor Pickard
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107038332
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Drawing from extensive archival research, the book uncovers the American media system's historical roots and normative foundations. It charts the rise and fall of a forgotten media-reform movement to recover alternatives and paths not taken.

Radio Propaganda and the Broadcasting of Hatred

Author: K. Somerville
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137284153
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An exposition and analysis of the development of propaganda, focusing on how the development of radio transformed the delivery and impact of propaganda and led to the use of radio to incite hatred and violence.

Rich Media Poor Democracy

Author: Robert W. McChesney
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1620970708
Format: PDF, ePub
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First published to great acclaim in 2000, Rich Media, Poor Democracy is Robert W. McChesney’s magnum opus. Called a “rich, penetrating study” by Noam Chomsky, the book is a meticulously researched exposition of how U.S. media and communication empires are threatening effective democratic governance. What happens when a few conglomerates dominate all major aspects of mass media, from newspapers and magazines to radio and broadcast television? Since the publication of this prescient work, which won Harvard’s Goldsmith Book Prize and the Kappa Tau Alpha Research Award, the concentration of media power and the resultant “hypercommercialization of culture” has only intensified. McChesney lays out his vision for what a truly democratic society might look like, offering compelling suggestions for how the media can be reformed as part of a broader program of democratic renewal. Rich Media, Poor Democracy remains as vital and insightful as ever and continues to serve as an important resource for researchers, students, and anyone who has a stake in the transformation of our digital commons. This new edition includes a major new preface by McChesney, where he offers both a history of the transformation in media since the book first appeared; a sweeping account of the organized efforts to reform the media system; and the ongoing threats to our democracy as journalism has continued its sharp decline.

Anatomy of Sound

Author: Jacob Smith
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520285328
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"This collection of essays examines one of the most important, yet understudied, media authors of all time--Norman Corwin--using him as a critical lens to consider the history of multimedia authorship, particularly in the realm of sound. Known for seven decades as the 'poet laureate' of radio, Corwin is most famous for his radio dramas, which reached tens of millions of listeners around the world and contributed to radio drama's success as a mass media form in the 1930s and 1940s. But Corwin was a pioneer in multiple media, including cinema, theater, TV, public service broadcasting, journalism, and even cantata. In each of these areas, Corwin had a distinctive approach to sonic aesthetics and mastery of multiple aspects of media production, relying in part on his inventive atmospheric effects in the studio both prerecorded, and, more impressively, live in real time. From the front lines of World War II to his role as Chief of Special Projects for United Nations Radio and his influence on media today, the political and social aspect of Corwin's work is woven into these essays. With a foreword by Michele Hilmes and contributions from Thomas Doherty, Mary Ann Watson, Shawn VanCour, David Ossman and others, this volume cements Corwin's reputation as perhaps the greatest writer in the history of radio, while also showing that his long career is a neglected model of multimedia authorship."--Provided by publisher.

Journalism in the Movies

Author: Matthew C. Ehrlich
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252091086
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Now in paperback, Matthew C. Ehrlich’s Journalism in the Movies is the story of Hollywood’s depiction of American journalism from the start of the sound era to the present. Ehrlich argues that films have relentlessly played off the image of the journalist as someone who sees through lies and hypocrisy, sticks up for the little guy, and serves democracy. Focusing on films about key figures and events in journalism, including Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, All the President’s Men, and The Insider, Journalism in the Movies presents a unique opportunity to reflect on how movies relate not only to journalism but also American life and democracy.

Watergate s Legacy and the Press

Author: Jon Marshall
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810127199
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein exemplify on era when investigative reporters were seen as courageous fighters of corruption and injustice. Their epoch-making expose of the Watergate conspiracy not only contributed to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon but also set the standard to which successive generations of investigative reporters have aspired. In Watergate's Legacy and the Press, John Marshall recounts this captivating story and details the complex ways in which the press and American government have reshaped themselves in its wake. Marshall's thorough understanding of the history of these institutions gives rise to insights regarding present and future challenges. Although many mainstream reporting. Marshall finds hope in the opportunities offered by blogs, crowdsourcing, and nonprofit institutions. The result of painstaking research and scholarship, Watergate's Legacy and the Press is ultimately a tribute to the irrepressible investigative impulse in American journalism and the crucial public service provided by investigative reporters.