Seeking justices

Author: Michael Comiskey
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN: 9780700613465
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the long shadows cast by the Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas nominations, Supreme Court confirmations remain highly contentious and controversial. This is due in part to the Senate's increasing reliance upon a much lengthier, much more public, and occasionally raucous confirmation process--in an effort to curb the potential excesses of executive power created by presidents seeking greater control over the Court's ideological composition. Michael Comiskey offers the most comprehensive, systematic, and optimistic analysis of that process to date. Arguing that the process works well and therefore should not be significantly altered, Comiskey convincingly counters those critics who view highly contentious confirmation proceedings as the norm. Senators have every right and a real obligation, he contends, to scrutinize the nominees' constitutional philosophies. He further argues that the media coverage of the Senate's deliberations has worked to improve the level of such scrutiny and that recent presidents have neither exerted excessive influence on the appointment process nor created a politically extreme Court. He also examines the ongoing concern over presidential efforts to pack the court, concluding that stacking the ideological deck is unlikely. As an exception to the rule, Comiskey analyzes in depth the Thomas confirmation to explain why it was an aberration, offering the most detailed account yet of Thomas's pre-judicial professional and political activities. He argues that the Senate Judiciary Committee abdicated its responsibilities out of deference to Thomas's race. Another of the book's unique features is Comiskey's reassessment of the reputations of twentieth-century SupremeCourt justices. Based on a survey of nearly 300 scholars in constitutional law and politics, it shows that the modern confirmation process continues to fill Court vacancies with jurists as capable as those of earlier eras. We

Pursuit of Justices

Author: David Alistair Yalof
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226945460
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Yalof takes the reader behind the scenes of what happens before the Senate hearings to show how presidents decide who will sit on the highest court in the land. He draws on the papers of 7 modern presidents and firsthand interviews with key figures.

Judicial Politics in the United States

Author: Mark C. Miller
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429973233
Format: PDF
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Judicial Politics in the United States examines the role of courts as policymaking institutions and their interactions with the other branches of government and other political actors in the U.S. political system. Not only does this book cover the nuts and bolts of the functions, structures and processes of our courts and legal system, it goes beyond other judicial process books by exploring how the courts interact with executives, legislatures, and state and federal bureaucracies. It also includes a chapter devoted to the courts' interactions with interest groups, the media, and general public opinion and a chapter that looks at how American courts and judges interact with other judiciaries around the world. Judicial Politics in the United States balances coverage of judicial processes with discussions of the courts' interactions with our larger political universe, making it an essential text for students of judicial politics.

Supreme Democracy

Author: Richard Davis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190656980
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Supreme Court nominations were driven by presidents, senators, and some legal community elites. Many nominations were quick processes with little Senate deliberation, minimal publicity and almost no public involvement. Today, however, confirmation takes 81 days on average-Justice Antonin Scalia's former seat has already taken much longer to fill-and it is typically a media spectacle. How did the Supreme Court nomination process become so public and so nakedly political? What forces led to the current high-stakes status of the process? How could we implement reforms to improve the process? In Supreme Democracy: The End of Elitism in the Supreme Court Nominations, Richard Davis, an eminent scholar of American politics and the courts, traces the history of nominations from the early republic to the present. He examines the component parts of the nomination process one by one: the presidential nomination stage, the confirmation management process, the role of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the increasing involvement over time of interest groups, the news media, and public opinion. The most dramatic development, however, has been the democratization of politics. Davis delves into the constitutional underpinnings of the nomination process and its traditional form before describing a more democratic process that has emerged in the past half century. He details the struggle over image-making between supporters and opponents intended to influence the news media and public opinion. Most importantly, he provides a thorough examination of whether or not increasing democracy always produces better governance, and a better Court. Not only an authoritative analysis of the Supreme Court nomination process from the founding era to the present, Supreme Democracy will be an essential guide to all of the protracted nomination battles yet to come.

The Development of the American Presidency

Author: Associate Professor of Political Science Richard J Ellis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136980601
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Our understanding of the politics of the presidency is greatly enhanced by viewing it through a developmental lens, analyzing how historical turns have shaped the modern institution. The Development of the American Presidency pays great attention to that historical weight but is organized topically and conceptually with the constitutional origins and political development of the presidency its central focus. Through comprehensive and in-depth coverage, this text looks at how the presidency has evolved in relation to the public, to Congress, to the Executive branch, and to the law, showing at every step how different aspects of the presidency have followed distinct trajectories of change. All the while, Ellis illustrates the institutional relationships and tensions through stories about particular individuals and specific political conflicts. Ellis's own classroom pedagogy of promoting active learning and critical thinking is well reflected in these pages. Each chapter begins with a narrative account of some illustrative puzzle that brings to life a central concept. A wealth of photos, figures, and tables allow for the visual presentations of concepts. A companion website not only acts as a further resources base—directing students to primary documents, newspapers, and data sources—but also presents interactive timelines, practice quizzes, and key terms to help students master the book's lessons.

The Politics of the Presidency Revised 8th Edition

Author: Joseph A Pika
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1452239940
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In the most up-to-date core text available on the presidency, Pika and Maltese once again deliver their comprehensive-and accessible-analysis of the presidency. Never losing sight of the foundations of the office, the authors maintain a balance between historical context and contemporary scholarship on the U.S. executive. A solid foundation for any presidency course, the revised eighth edition features a new chapter on the 2012 election and analysis of Obama's challenges as a second-term president in an entrenched partisan environment.

The Handy Supreme Court Answer Book

Author: David L Hudson
Publisher: Visible Ink Press
ISBN: 157859264X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From the origins of the court to modern practical matters—including the federal judiciary system, the Supreme Court’s session schedule, and the argument, decision, and appeal process—this resource provides detailed answers on all aspects of the Supreme Court. Exploring the social, cultural, and political atmosphere in which judges are nominated and serve, this guide book answers questions such as When did the tradition of nine justices on the bench begin? When did the practice of hiring law clerks to assist with legal research and writing begin? and How do cases reach the Supreme Court? Details on historic decisions—including Marbury v. Madison, Brown v. Board of Education, Miranda v. Arizona, and Bush v. Gore—accompany a thorough history of all 17 Supreme Court Chief Justices.

Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era

Author: Austin Sarat
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 0762314869
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This volume of "Studies in Law, Politics, and Society" presents a unique special issue "Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era." This issue brings together the work of leading scholars of Constitutionalism, Constitutional law, and politics in the United States to take stock of the field to chart its progress, and point the way for its future development. Much of the way Americans have thought about Constitutional law has, until recently, been dominated by models developed during the Warren Court Era. Today, however, scholars seek new approaches, approaches that do not take for granted liberal hegemony in the courts. Among these, theories of popular constitutionalism and judicial minimalism appear to be increasingly popular. How should Scholars think about American courts in an era of conservative domination of the judiciary? What should/will constitutional politics in the United States look like over the next decade?

Picking Federal Judges

Author: Sheldon Goldman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300080735
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Annotation A president's least-noticed important legacy is his Appointment of judges to the lower federal bench. How are these judges chosen? In this landmark book, a leading authority on lower federal court judicial selections tells the story of how nine presidents over a period of fifty-six years have chosen federal judges.

The Next Justice

Author: Christopher L. Eisgruber
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691143521
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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He describes a new and better manner of deliberating about who should serve on the Court - an approach that puts the burden on nominees to show that their judicial philosophies and politics are acceptable to senators and citizens alike. And he makes a new case for the virtue of judicial moderates."