Sovereignty

Author: Robert Jackson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 074565472X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Sovereignty is at the very centre of the political and legal arrangements of the modern world. The idea originated in the controversies and wars, both religious and political, of 16th and 17th century Europe and since that time it has continued to spread and evolve. Today sovereignty is a global system of authority: it extends across all religions, civilizations, languages, cultures, ethnic and racial groupings, and other collectivities into which humanity is divided. In this highly accessible book, Robert Jackson provides a concise and comprehensive introduction to the history and meaning of sovereignty. Drawing on a wide range of examples from the US Declaration of Independence to terrorist attacks of 9/11 he shows how sovereignty operates in our daily lives and analyses the issues raised by its universality and centrality in the organization of the world. The book covers core topics such as the discourse of sovereignty, the global expansion of sovereignty, the rise of popular sovereignty, and the relationship between sovereignty and human rights. It concludes by examining future challenges facing sovereignty in an era of globalization. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to a wide range of students, academics and general readers who seek to understand this fundamental concept of the modern world.

Sovereignty

Author: Dieter Grimm
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231539304
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Dieter Grimm’s accessible introduction to the concept of sovereignty ties the evolution of the idea to historical events, from the religious conflicts of sixteenth-century Europe to today’s trends in globalization and transnational institutions. Grimm wonders whether recent political changes have undermined notions of national sovereignty, comparing manifestations of the concept in different parts of the world. Geared for classroom use, the study maps various notions of sovereignty in relation to the people, the nation, the state, and the federation, distinguishing between internal and external types of sovereignty. Grimm’s book will appeal to political theorists and cultural-studies scholars and to readers interested in the role of charisma, power, originality, and individuality in political rule.

Revolutions in Sovereignty

Author: Daniel Philpott
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400824236
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How did the world come to be organized into sovereign states? Daniel Philpott argues that two historical revolutions in ideas are responsible. First, the Protestant Reformation ended medieval Christendom and brought a system of sovereign states in Europe, culminating at the Peace of Westphalia in 1648. Second, ideas of equality and colonial nationalism brought a sweeping end to colonial empires around 1960, spreading the sovereign states system to the rest of the globe. In both cases, revolutions in ideas about legitimate political authority profoundly altered the "constitution" that establishes basic authority in the international system. Ideas exercised influence first by shaping popular identities, then by exercising social power upon the elites who could bring about new international constitutions. Swaths of early modern Europeans, for instance, arrived at Protestant beliefs, then fought against the temporal powers of the Church on behalf of the sovereignty of secular princes, who could overthrow the formidable remains of a unified medieval Christendom. In the second revolution, colonial nationalists, domestic opponents of empire, and rival superpowers pressured European cabinets to relinquish their colonies in the name of equality and nationalism, resulting in a global system of sovereign states. Bringing new theoretical and historical depth to the study of international relations, Philpott demonstrates that while shifts in military, economic, and other forms of material power cannot be overlooked, only ideas can explain how the world came to be organized into a system of sovereign states.

Law Power and the Sovereign State

Author: Michael Ross Fowler
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271039114
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In the wake of the collapse of the Soviet bloc, it is timely to ask what continuing role, if any, the concept of sovereignty can and should play in the emerging &"new world order.&" The aim of Law, Power, and the Sovereign State is both to counter the argument that the end of the sovereign state is close at hand and to bring scholarship on sovereignty into the post-Cold War era. The study assesses sovereignty as status and as power and examines the issue of what precisely constitutes a sovereign state. In determining how a political entity gains sovereignty, the authors introduce the requirements of de facto independence and de jure independence and explore the ambiguities inherent in each. They also examine the political process by which the international community formally confers sovereign status. Fowler and Bunck trace the continuing tension of the &"chunk and basket&" theories of sovereignty through the history of international sovereignty disputes and conclude by considering the usefulness of sovereignty as a concept in the future study and conduct of international affairs. They find that, despite frequent predictions of its imminent demise, the concept of sovereignty is alive and well as the twentieth century draws to a close.

Changing Norms Through Actions

Author: Jennifer M. Ramos
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199924864
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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How do international norms evolve? This book focuses on the most important norm in the international system-the norm of sovereignty-and argues that the extent to which norms change depends on the outcome of military intervention.

Sovereignty in Fragments

Author: Hent Kalmo
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139495232
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The political make-up of the contemporary world changes with such rapidity that few attempts have been made to consider with adequate care, the nature and value of the concept of sovereignty. What exactly is meant when one speaks about the acquisition, preservation, infringement or loss of sovereignty? This book revisits the assumptions underlying the applications of this fundamental category, as well as studying the political discourses in which it has been embedded. Bringing together historians, constitutional lawyers, political philosophers and experts in international relations, Sovereignty in Fragments seeks to dispel the illusion that there is a unitary concept of sovereignty of which one could offer a clear definition. This book will appeal to scholars and advanced students of international relations, international law and the history of political thought.

Sovereignty

Author: Stephen D. Krasner
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400823260
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The acceptance of human rights and minority rights, the increasing role of international financial institutions, and globalization have led many observers to question the continued viability of the sovereign state. Here a leading expert challenges this conclusion. Stephen Krasner contends that states have never been as sovereign as some have supposed. Throughout history, rulers have been motivated by a desire to stay in power, not by some abstract adherence to international principles. Organized hypocrisy--the presence of longstanding norms that are frequently violated--has been an enduring attribute of international relations. Political leaders have usually but not always honored international legal sovereignty, the principle that international recognition should be accorded only to juridically independent sovereign states, while treating Westphalian sovereignty, the principle that states have the right to exclude external authority from their own territory, in a much more provisional way. In some instances violations of the principles of sovereignty have been coercive, as in the imposition of minority rights on newly created states after the First World War or the successor states of Yugoslavia after 1990; at other times cooperative, as in the European Human Rights regime or conditionality agreements with the International Monetary Fund. The author looks at various issues areas to make his argument: minority rights, human rights, sovereign lending, and state creation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Differences in national power and interests, he concludes, not international norms, continue to be the most powerful explanation for the behavior of states.

International Disputes and Cultural Ideas in the Canadian Arctic

Author: Danita Catherine Burke
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319619179
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book explores the Canadian relationship with its portion of the Arctic region which revolves around the dramatic split between the appearance of absent-minded governance, bordering on indifference toward the region, and the raging nationalism during moments of actual and perceived challenge toward the sovereignty of the imagined “Canadian Arctic region.” Canada’s nationalistic relationship with the Arctic region is often discussed as a reactionary phenomenon to the Americanization of Canada and the product of government propaganda. As this book illustrates, however, the complexity and evolution of the Canadian relationship with the Arctic region and its implication for Canada’s approach toward international relations requires a more in-depth exploration Please be aware than an error has been noted for Table 1.1 on page 71. In this table the sub-category “Inuit” is mislabelled. It should read “Native Indians and Inuit” as the data presented represents this Canadian census sub-category which calculated all indigenous peoples and Inuit peoples together.

Sovereign Evolution

Author: Ezrah Aharone
Publisher: Author House
ISBN: 1467056782
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Rated “24th Best Black Book of 2009” – Inside Black Hollywood Magazine From emancipation to segregation to integration, African Americans exist today by virtue of a continuum of political evolutions, each of which is built upon prior legacies and achievements. In advancing our political progression, Sovereign Evolution re-declares freedom and equality in 21st-century terms, using sovereign principles and standards. Whether the issue concerns Katrina and Jena, or being underrepresented in Congress and overrepresented in penitentiaries, the common thread as Ezrah Aharone demonstrates, is that African Americans are an Un-Sovereign People, who pay varying degrees of Un-Sovereign Consequences. Thus, in a very methodical manner, he circumscribes sovereignty in a universal and historical context that confers African Americans with just as much integrity and authority as any other people to espouse and employ sovereign aspirations. The ideological framework herein self-applies and legitimizes the concept of sovereignty in ways that no other work has succinctly captured in politically-relatable terms, specific for African Americans. Realizing that not all African Americans will embrace sovereign values, Aharone uniquely specifies how a Sovereign Evolution can mutually advance the best interests of us all, without conflict or compromise to core beliefs of anyone. Accordingly, the book sets a platform to infuse sovereign discourse into mainstream domains that reach from street corners of “the hoods,” to Black universities, to church congregations, to the halls of Congress. The advent of President Barack Obama indicates a necessary and long-awaited political shift in time and history, which also conveys veiled implications of our sovereign potentials as a people. What once seemed politically improbable has proven to be politically achievable. Our only political limitations exist within the limits of our vision and courage. To this end, Ezrah Aharone factually sculpts the sociopolitical substance of our historical experience into a sovereign consciousness and political language to initiate a Manifest Destiny from “Civil Rights” to “Sovereign Rights.”

Sovereignty as Symbolic Form

Author: Jens Bartelson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317685830
Format: PDF
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This book is a critical inquiry into sovereignty and argues that the meaning and functions performed by this concept have changed significantly during the past decades, with profound implications for the ontological status of the state and the modus operandi of the international system as a whole. Although we have grown accustomed to regarding sovereignty as a defining characteristic of the modern state and as a constitutive principle of the international system, Sovereignty as Symbolic Form argues that recent changes indicate that sovereignty has been turned into something granted, contingent upon its responsible exercise in accordance with the norms and values of an imagined international community. Hence we need a new understanding of sovereignty in order to clarify the logic of its current usage in theory and practice alike, and its connection to broader concerns of social ontology: what kind of world do we inhabit, and of what kind of entities is this world composed? This book will be of interest to students of International Relations, Critical Security and International Politics.