Crisis and Leviathan

Author: Robert Higgs
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195059007
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Few topics are as timely as the growth of government. To understand why government has grown, Robert Higgs asserts, one must understand how it has grown. This book offers a coherent, multi-causal explanation, guided by a novel analytical framework firmly grounded in historical evidence. More than a study of trends in governmental spending, taxation, and employment, Crisis and Leviathan is a thorough analysis of the actual occasions when and the specific means by which Big Government developed in the United States. Naming names and highlighting the actions of significant individuals, Higgs examines how twentieth-century national emergencies--mainly wars, depressions, and labor disturbances--have prompted federal officials to take over previously private rights and activities. When the crises passed, a residue of new governmental powers remained. Even more significantly, each great crisis and the subsequent governmental measures have gone hand in hand with reinforcing shifts in public beliefs and attitudes toward the government's proper role in American life. Integrating the contributions of scholars in diverse disciplines, including history, law, political philosophy, and the social sciences, Crisis and Leviathan makes compelling reading for all those who seek to understand the transformation of America's political economy over the past century.

The Growth of American Government

Author: Ballard C. Campbell
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253209627
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"This ambitious, well-written book will be a useful resource for scholars... an excellent overview... a fine, readable introduction that presents its analysis in a straightforward manner free from ideological baggage." —Congress & The Presidency "A refreshingly unorthodox narrative. Campbell [explains] in plain language how government grew. His stance is neither liberal nor conservative, but simply well-informed and reasonable." —Walter Nugent, University of Notre Dame "The canvas is large, but one comes away from the book with an understanding of what has happened, the factors contributing to these developments, and their consequences. Strongly recommended." —Samuel McSeveney, Vanderbilt University "Ballard Campbell has synthesized an amazing range of material: federal, state and even local studies, from history, political science, economics, and assorted other specialized studies. The product is a strikingly comprehensive and readable history of the rise of government in the USA. Even better, it provides a coherent explanation of why the state grew so large." —Richard Jensen, University of Illinois-Chicago "His overview (chapter 2) should be a compulsory assignment for any seminar on modern political culture... " —The Journal of American History "Campbell's book is a marvelous multidisciplinary synthesis that builds on the findings of historians of national, state, and local government, along with those of economists and political scientists, to provide a coherent account of the rise of modern American governing structures." —Journal of Interdisciplinary History "The book should be useful in the classroom, even for freshmen classes in U.S. history and government." —American Historical Review "Readable, and refreshingly unorthodox, Campbell provides a coherent explanation of how and why government has become so large. His book deserves inclusion in any undergraduate bibliography covering the development of American government." —Political Studies Association This engaging survey of the growth of government in America in the last century focuses on the evolution of public policy and its relationship to the constitutional and political structure of government at the federal, state, and local levels.

The Growth of American Government

Author: Ballard C. Campbell
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253209627
Format: PDF
Download Now
"This ambitious, well-written book will be a useful resource for scholars... an excellent overview... a fine, readable introduction that presents its analysis in a straightforward manner free from ideological baggage." —Congress & The Presidency "A refreshingly unorthodox narrative. Campbell [explains] in plain language how government grew. His stance is neither liberal nor conservative, but simply well-informed and reasonable." —Walter Nugent, University of Notre Dame "The canvas is large, but one comes away from the book with an understanding of what has happened, the factors contributing to these developments, and their consequences. Strongly recommended." —Samuel McSeveney, Vanderbilt University "Ballard Campbell has synthesized an amazing range of material: federal, state and even local studies, from history, political science, economics, and assorted other specialized studies. The product is a strikingly comprehensive and readable history of the rise of government in the USA. Even better, it provides a coherent explanation of why the state grew so large." —Richard Jensen, University of Illinois-Chicago "His overview (chapter 2) should be a compulsory assignment for any seminar on modern political culture... " —The Journal of American History "Campbell's book is a marvelous multidisciplinary synthesis that builds on the findings of historians of national, state, and local government, along with those of economists and political scientists, to provide a coherent account of the rise of modern American governing structures." —Journal of Interdisciplinary History "The book should be useful in the classroom, even for freshmen classes in U.S. history and government." —American Historical Review "Readable, and refreshingly unorthodox, Campbell provides a coherent explanation of how and why government has become so large. His book deserves inclusion in any undergraduate bibliography covering the development of American government." —Political Studies Association This engaging survey of the growth of government in America in the last century focuses on the evolution of public policy and its relationship to the constitutional and political structure of government at the federal, state, and local levels.

From Liberty to Democracy

Author: Randall G. Holcombe
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472112902
Format: PDF, Docs
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An analysis of American political history using the economic framework of public choice theory

The Rise of the Federal Colossus The Growth of Federal Power from Lincoln to F D R

Author: Peter Zavodnyik
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313392943
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This challenging book explores the debates over the scope of the enumerated powers of Congress and the Fourteenth Amendment that accompanied the expansion of federal authority during the period between the beginning of the Civil War and the inauguration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. • Numerous citations of the Congressional Record and federal court opinions • Scores of articles from magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals of the period that reveal how Americans of all walks of life perceived the evolution of federal authority • A select bibliography listing a wide variety of secondary works ranging from biographies to legal treatises that will aid the reader in further exploring the evolution of American federalism • A helpful index that provides access to roles and views of critical figures in the evolution of federal authority during the middle period

The Case for Big Government

Author: Jeff Madrick
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834808
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Political conservatives have long believed that the best government is a small government. But if this were true, noted economist Jeff Madrick argues, the nation would not be experiencing stagnant wages, rising health care costs, increasing unemployment, and concentrations of wealth for a narrow elite. In this perceptive and eye-opening book, Madrick proves that an engaged government--a big government of high taxes and wise regulations--is necessary for the social and economic answers that Americans desperately need in changing times. He shows that the big governments of past eras fostered greatness and prosperity, while weak, laissez-faire governments marked periods of corruption and exploitation. The Case for Big Government considers whether the government can adjust its current policies and set the country right. Madrick explains why politics and economics should go hand in hand; why America benefits when the government actively nourishes economic growth; and why America must reject free market orthodoxy and adopt ambitious government-centered programs. He looks critically at today's politicians--at Republicans seeking to revive nineteenth-century principles, and at Democrats who are abandoning the pioneering efforts of the Great Society. Madrick paints a devastating portrait of the nation's declining social opportunities and how the economy has failed its workers. He looks critically at today's politicians and demonstrates that the government must correct itself to address these serious issues. A practical call to arms, The Case for Big Government asks for innovation, experimentation, and a willingness to fail. The book sets aside ideology and proposes bold steps to ensure the nation's vitality.

Government and the American Economy

Author: Price V. Fishback
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226251295
Format: PDF
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The American economy has provided a level of well-being that has consistently ranked at or near the top of the international ladder. A key source of this success has been widespread participation in political and economic processes. In The Government and the American Economy, leading economic historians chronicle the significance of America’s open-access society and the roles played by government in its unrivaled success story. America’s democratic experiment, the authors show, allowed individuals and interest groups to shape the structure and policies of government, which, in turn, have fostered economic success and innovation by emphasizing private property rights, the rule of law, and protections of individual freedom. In response to new demands for infrastructure, America’s federal structure hastened development by promoting the primacy of states, cities, and national governments. More recently, the economic reach of American government expanded dramatically as the populace accepted stronger limits on its economic freedoms in exchange for the increased security provided by regulation, an expanded welfare state, and a stronger national defense.

Liberty and Coercion

Author: Gary Gerstle
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780691178219
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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American governance is burdened by a paradox. On the one hand, Americans don't want "big government" meddling in their lives; on the other hand, they have repeatedly enlisted governmental help to impose their views regarding marriage, abortion, religion, and schooling on their neighbors. These contradictory stances on the role of public power have paralyzed policymaking and generated rancorous disputes about government's legitimate scope. How did we reach this political impasse? Historian Gary Gerstle, looking at two hundred years of U.S. history, argues that the roots of the current crisis lie in two contrasting theories of power that the Framers inscribed in the Constitution. One theory shaped the federal government, setting limits on its power in order to protect personal liberty. Another theory molded the states, authorizing them to go to extraordinary lengths, even to the point of violating individual rights, to advance the "good and welfare of the commonwealth." The Framers believed these theories could coexist comfortably, but conflict between the two has largely defined American history. Gerstle shows how national political leaders improvised brilliantly to stretch the power of the federal government beyond where it was meant to go--but at the cost of giving private interests and state governments too much sway over public policy. The states could be innovative, too. More impressive was their staying power. Only in the 1960s did the federal government, impelled by the Cold War and civil rights movement, definitively assert its primacy. But as the power of the central state expanded, its constitutional authority did not keep pace. Conservatives rebelled, making the battle over government's proper dominion the defining issue of our time. From the Revolution to the Tea Party, and the Bill of Rights to the national security state, Liberty and Coercion is a revelatory account of the making and unmaking of government in America.