The Immigrant Paradox in Children and Adolescents

Author: Cynthia T. García Coll
Publisher: Amer Psychological Assn
ISBN: 9781433810534
Format: PDF, ePub
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"In this edited volume, we seek to provide a better understanding of child and adolescent development in the contexts of parent immigration to the United States during the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st. The families studied in this book represent those who have experienced immigration processes in a particular time and place, or perhaps better said-- times and places. They represent part of a major demographic shift in the United States (See Chapter 1, this volume). They differ from previous waves of U.S. migrants by place of origin, language, race, and ethnicity. The earlier waves were mostly from Europe; the more recent have been from Latin America and Asia. This book is the first to devote itself to the documentation and explanation of the immigrant paradox in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. The book is intended for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and colleagues in the area of immigration or ethnic studies, sociology, psychology, and education. Both authors and editors hope that our readers will increase their knowledge of immigration in general as well as of the specific and sometimes extraordinary demands this process entails and the assets and liabilities that these families have to cope with these demands. In addition, readers will learn where the immigrant paradox exists in education and behavior as well as some health outcomes among youth in immigrant families. Also elucidated here is how both settings and personal attributes contribute to the paradox and the differential outcomes observed not only by generation but by ethnic group and age. Most important, the implications for policy and practice, we hope, will come not only from our own writing but from our readers' informed interpretation and understanding of the phenomena"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

Transitions

Author: Carola Suárez-Orozco
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814770177
Format: PDF
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Immigration to the United States has reached historic numbers— 25 percent of children under the age of 18 have an immigrant parent, and this number is projected to grow to one in three by 2050. These children have become a significant part of our national tapestry, and how they fare is deeply intertwined with the future of our nation. Immigrant children and the children of immigrants face unique developmental challenges. Navigating two distinct cultures at once, immigrant-origin children have no expert guides to lead them through the process. Instead, they find themselves acting as guides for their parents. How are immigrant children like all other children, and how are they unique? What challenges as well as what opportunities do their circumstances present for their development? What characteristics are they likely to share because they have immigrant parents, and what characteristics are unique to specific groups of origin? How are children of first-generation immigrants different from those of second-generation immigrants? Transitions offers comprehensive coverage of the field’s best scholarship on the development of immigrant children, providing an overview of what the field needs to know—or at least systematically begin to ask—about the immigrant child and adolescent from a developmental perspective. This book takes an interdisciplinary perspective to consider how personal, social, and structural factors interact to determine a variety of trajectories of development. The editors have curated contributions from experts across a carefully selected variety of topics covering ecologies, processes, and outcomes of development pertinent to immigrant origin children.

No Undocumented Child Left Behind

Author: Michael A. Olivas
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814762441
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Explores the issue of the education of undocumented school children, examining both financial and legal topics.

Immigrant Families in Contemporary Society

Author: Jennifer E. Lansford
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1606232479
Format: PDF, Kindle
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How do some families successfully negotiate the linguistic, cultural, and psychological challenges of immigration, while others struggle to acculturate? This timely volume explores the complexities of immigrant family life in North America and analyzes the individual and contextual factors that influence health and well-being. Synthesizing cutting-edge research from a range of disciplines, the book addresses such key topics as child development, school achievement, and the cultural and religious contexts of parenting. It examines the interface between families and broader systems, including schools, social services, and intervention programs, and discusses how practices and policies might be improved to produce optimal outcomes for this large and diverse population.

Immigrant Children

Author: Susan S. Chuang
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739167065
Format: PDF
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This edited book focuses on immigrant and refugee children around the world and will provide readers with a richer and more comprehensive approach of how researchers, practitioners, and social policymakers can examine immigrant children and youth among ethnic minority families. Also, the chapters will focus on the various methodological advances used to explicitly investigate immigrant children and youth.

Realizing the Potential of Immigrant Youth

Author: Ann S. Masten
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107019508
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The success and well-being of immigrant youth has become a vital issue for many receiving societies in North America and Europe as a result of global migration. This volume brings together leading scholars on immigrant youth to discuss current research and its implications for education, policy, and intervention.

Immigrant Stories

Author: Cynthia Garcia Coll
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199721269
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Immigrant Stories portrays the contexts and academic trajectories of development of three unique immigrant groups: Cambodian, Dominican and Portuguese. The children of immigrant families - or second generation youth - are the fastest growing population of school children in the US. However, very little is known about these children's academic and psychological development during middle childhood. We examine the previously under-explored intricacies of children's emerging cultural attitudes and identities, academic engagement, and academic achievement. These processes are studied alongside a myriad of factors in the family and school environment that combine to shape children's academic psychological functioning during this important period. Through a three-year longitudinal study, including interviews with teachers, parents and children, this book presents a fascinating look at the community, school, and family contexts of child development among second-generation children. Both pre-immigration and post-immigration characteristics are explored as critical factors for understanding children of immigrants' development. In the current climate of US immigration policy debate, we offer research findings that may inform educators and administrators about the sources of community strengths and challenges facing our newest immigrant generations.

Keeping the Immigrant Bargain

Author: Vivian Louie
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 1610447794
Format: PDF
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Most nineteenth and early-twentieth-century European immigrants arrived in the United States with barely more than the clothes on their backs. They performed menial jobs, spoke little English, and often faced a hostile reception. But two or more generations later, the overwhelming majority of their descendants had successfully integrated into American society. Today's immigrants face many of the same challenges, but some experts worry that their integration, especially among Latinos, will not be as successful as their European counterparts. Keeping the Immigrant Bargain examines the journey of Dominican and Colombian newcomers whose children have achieved academic success one generation after the arrival of their parents. Sociologist Vivian Louie provides a much-needed comparison of how both parents and children understand the immigrant journey toward education, mobility, and assimilation. Based on Louie's own survey and interview study, Keeping the Immigrant Bargain examines the lives of thirty-seven foreign-born Dominican and Colombian parents and their seventy-six young adult offspring—the majority of whom were enrolled in or had graduated from college. The book shows how they are adapting to American schools, jobs, neighborhoods, and culture. Louie discovers that before coming to the United States, some of these parents had already achieved higher levels of education than the average foreign-born Dominican or Colombian, and after arrival many owned their own homes. Significantly, most parents in each group expressed optimism about their potential to succeed in the United States, while also expressing pessimism about whether they would ever be accepted as Americans. In contrast to the social exclusion experienced by their parents, most of the young adults had assimilated linguistically and believed themselves to be full participants in American society. Keeping the Immigrant Bargain shows that the offspring of these largely working-class immigrants had several factors in common that aided their mobility. Their parents were highly engaged in their lives and educational progress, although not always in ways expected by schools or their children, and the children possessed a strong degree of self-motivation. Equally important was the availability of key institutional networks of support, including teachers, peers, afterschool and other enrichment programs, and informal mentors outside of the classroom. These institutional networks gave the children the guidance they needed to succeed in school, offering information the parents often did not know themselves. While not all immigrants achieve such rapid success, this engrossing study shows how powerful the combination of self-motivation, engaged families, and strong institutional support can be. Keeping the Immigrant Bargain makes the case that institutional relationships—such as teachers and principals who are trained to accommodate cultural difference and community organizations that help parents and children learn how to navigate the system—can bear significantly on immigrant educational success.

Immigrant America

Author: Alejandro Portes
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520940482
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This third edition of the widely acclaimed classic has been thoroughly expanded and updated to reflect current demographic, economic, and political realities. Drawing on recent census data and other primary sources, Portes and Rumbaut have infused the entire text with new information and added a vivid array of new vignettes and illustrations. Recognized for its superb portrayal of immigration and immigrant lives in the United States, this book probes the dynamics of immigrant politics, examining questions of identity and loyalty among newcomers, and explores the psychological consequences of varying modes of migration and acculturation. The authors look at patterns of settlement in urban America, discuss the problems of English-language acquisition and bilingual education, explain how immigrants incorporate themselves into the American economy, and examine the trajectories of their children from adolescence to early adulthood. With a vital new chapter on religion—and fresh analyses of topics ranging from patterns of incarceration to the mobility of the second generation and the unintended consequences of public policies—this updated edition is indispensable for framing and informing issues that promise to be even more hotly and urgently contested as the subject moves to the center of national debate..

Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents

Author: Luis A. Moreno
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441960399
Format: PDF, Docs
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Despite adults’ best preventive efforts, childhood obesity is on the rise in most areas of the world, and with it the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and other formerly adult-onset conditions. Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents takes the global ecological approach that is needed to understand the scope of the problem and its multiple causes and mechanisms, and to aid in developing more effective prevention and intervention programs. In the book’s first half, experts present a descriptive summary of youth obesity trends in ten world regions, broken down by age group, gender, socioeconomic status, and risk factors. Complementing these findings, part two reviews the evidence base regarding the variables, separately and in combination, having the most significant impact on young people’s development of obesity, including: • Genetic and nutrigenomic factors. • Environmental and psychosocial factors, such as family shopping and eating habits and access to healthful foods. • Neuroendocrine regulation. • Prenatal and neonatal factors (e.g., gestational diabetes of the mother). • Dietary factors, from nutrient content to young people’s food preferences. • Physical activity versus sedentary behavior. Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents is necessary reading for the range of professionals involved in curtailing this epidemic, including public health specialists, epidemiologists, pediatricians, nurses, nutritionists, psychologists, health educators, and policymakers.