The Ku Klux Klan in the City 1915 1930

Author: Kenneth T. Jackson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0929587820
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Revising conventional wisdom about the Klan, Mr. Jackson shows that its roots in the 1920s can also be found in the burgeoning cities. Comprehensively researched, methodically organized, lucidly written...a book to be respected. Journal of American History."

The Ku Klux Klan in the City 1915 1930

Author: Kenneth T. Jackson
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee
ISBN: 1461730058
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For decades the most frightening example of bigotry and hatred in America, the Ku Klux Klan has usually been seen as a rural and small-town product–an expression of the decline of the countryside in the face of rising urban society. Kenneth Jackson's important book revises conventional wisdom about the Klan. He shows that its roots in the 1920s can also be found in burgeoning cities among people who were frightened, dislocated, and uprooted by rapid changes in urban life. Many joined the Klan for sincere patriotic motives, unaware of the ugly prejudice that lay beneath the civic rhetoric. Mr. Jackson not only dissects the Klan's activities and membership, he also traces its impact on the public life of the twenties. In many places—from Atlanta to Dallas, from Buffalo to Portland, Oregon—the Klan agitated politics, held immense power, and won elective office. The Ku Klux Klan in the City is a continuing and timely reminder of the tensions and antagonisms beneath the surface of our national life. "Comprehensively researched, methodically organized, lucidly written...a book to be respected."—Journal of American History.

The Fiery Cross

Author: Wyn Craig Wade
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195123579
Format: PDF, Docs
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The story of the development of the Ku Klux Klan, from its origins in the Reconstruction era to its position as a terrorist group in the 1980s

Gospel According to the Klan

Author: Kelly J. Baker
Publisher: Culture America (Hardcover)
ISBN: 9780700624478
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Shows that the Ku Klux Klan based its justifications for hatred on a particular brand of Protestantism that resonated with mainstream Americans. Analyzes the complex religious arguments the Klan crafted to gain acceptability and credibility, and reveals how successful those messages were--and how they still resonate today.

Crabgrass Frontier

Author: Kenneth T. Jackson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195049831
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Traces the development of American suburbs, suggests reasons for their growth, compares American residential patterns with those of Europe and Japan, and looks at future trends

The Second Coming of the KKK The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition

Author: Linda Gordon
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 1631493701
Format: PDF, Docs
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An urgent examination into the revived Klan of the 1920s becomes “required reading” for our time (New York Times Book Review). Extraordinary national acclaim accompanied the publication of award-winning historian Linda Gordon’s disturbing and markedly timely history of the reassembled Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s. Dramatically challenging our preconceptions of the hooded Klansmen responsible for establishing a Jim Crow racial hierarchy in the 1870s South, this “second Klan” spread in states principally above the Mason-Dixon line by courting xenophobic fears surrounding the flood of immigrant “hordes” landing on American shores. “Part cautionary tale, part expose” (Washington Post), The Second Coming of the KKK “illuminates the surprising scope of the movement” (The New Yorker); the Klan attracted four-to-six-million members through secret rituals, manufactured news stories, and mass “Klonvocations” prior to its collapse in 1926?but not before its potent ideology of intolerance became part and parcel of the American tradition. A “must-read” (Salon) for anyone looking to understand the current moment, The Second Coming of the KKK offers “chilling comparisons to the present day” (New York Review of Books). 8 pages of illustrations

Ku Klux Kulture

Author: Felix Harcourt
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022637615X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Felix Harcourt examines the cultural life of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s, revealing how deeply the racist and hate-filled organization was embedded in American life. The Klan owned radio stations, newspapers, sports teams, and more, and its members were more engaged than the average American with popular songs, movies, plays, and literature. Harcourt shows how the Klan's ideology became subsumed in sunnier popular portrayals, and in the process he challenges prevailing depictions of the 1920s, which may be best understood not as the Jazz Age or the Age of Prohibition but as the Age of the Klan.

Politics Society and the Klan in Alabama 1915 1949

Author: Glenn Feldman
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817309845
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This first book-length examination of the Klan in Alabama represents exhaustive research that challenges traditional interpretations. The Ku Klux Klan has wielded considerable power both as a terrorist group and as a political force. Usually viewed as appearing in distinct incarnations, the Klans of the 20th century are now shown by Glenn Feldman to have a greater degree of continuity than has been previously suspected. Victims of Klan terrorism continued to be aliens, foreigners, or outsiders in Alabama: the freed slave during Reconstruction, the 1920s Catholic or Jew, the 1930s labor organizer or Communist, and the returning black veteran of World War II were all considered a threat to the dominant white culture. Feldman offers new insights into this "qualified continuity" among Klans of different eras, showing that the group remained active during the 1930s and 1940s when it was presumed dormant, with elements of the "Reconstruction syndrome" carrying over to the smaller Klan of the civil rights era. In addition, Feldman takes a critical look at opposition to Klan activities by southern elites. He particularly shows how opponents during the Great Depression and war years saw the Klan as an impediment to attracting outside capital and federal relief or as a magnet for federal action that would jeopardize traditional forms of racial and social control. Other critics voiced concerns about negative national publicity, and others deplored the violence and terrorism. This in-depth examination of the Klan in a single state, which features rare photographs, provides a means of understanding the order's development throughout the South. Feldman's book represents definitive research into the history of the Klan and makes a major contribution to our understanding of both that organization and the history of Alabama.