The Virtual Window

Author: Anne Friedberg
Publisher: MIT Press (MA)
ISBN: 9780262512503
Format: PDF
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From the Renaissance idea of the painting as an open window to the nested windows andmultiple images on today's cinema, television, and computer screens: a cultural history of themetaphoric, literal, and virtual window.

The Virtual Window

Author: Anne Friedberg
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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The author "examines the window as metaphor, as architectural component, and as an opening to the dematerialized reality framed on the screen, reminding us that how the world is framed is as important as what is in the frame."--P. [4] of cover.

Screens

Author: Kate Mondloch
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816665214
Format: PDF
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Media screens—film, video, and computer screens—have increasingly pervaded both artistic production and everyday life since the 1960s. Yet the nature of viewing artworks made from these media, along with their subjective effects, remains largely unexplored. Screens addresses this gap, offering a historical and theoretical framework for understanding screen-reliant installation art and the spectatorship it evokes.Examining a range of installations created over the past fifty years that investigate the rich terrain between the sculptural and the cinematic, including works by artists such as Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Doug Aitken, Peter Campus, Dan Graham, VALIE EXPORT, Bruce Nauman, and Michael Snow, Kate Mondloch traces the construction of screen spectatorship in art from the seminal film and video installations of the 1960s and 1970s to the new media artworks of today’s digital culture.Mondloch identifies a momentous shift in contemporary art that challenges key premises of spectatorship brought about by technological objects that literally and metaphorically filter the subject’s field of vision. As a result she proposes that contemporary viewers are, quite literally, screen subjects and offers the unique critical leverage of art as an alternative way to understand media culture and contemporary visuality.

Cinematic Appeals

Author: Ariel Rogers
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231535783
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen films drew the spectator into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. The technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with manipulating the viewer's physical response and more with generating information flow, awe, disorientation, and the disintegration of spatial boundaries. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time. Films discussed include Elia Kazan's East of Eden (1955), Star Wars: Phantom Menace (1999), The Matrix (1999), and Thomas Vinterberg's Dogme film Celebration (1995).

Cinema and the Invention of Modern Life

Author: Leo Charney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520201125
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"This is one of the finest, freshest, and most suggestive anthologies I've come across in recent years."--Stuart Liebman, City University of New York Graduate Center

Video

Author: Yvonne Spielmann
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262515177
Format: PDF, ePub
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An argument that video is not merely an intermediate stage between analog and digitalbut a medium in its own right; traces the theoretical genealogy of video and examines the differentconcepts of video seen in works by Vito Acconci, Ulrike Rosenbach, Steina and Woody Vasulka, andothers.

A Prehistory of the Cloud

Author: Tung-Hui Hu
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262330105
Format: PDF, Mobi
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We may imagine the digital cloud as placeless, mute, ethereal, and unmediated. Yet the reality of the cloud is embodied in thousands of massive data centers, any one of which can use as much electricity as a midsized town. Even all these data centers are only one small part of the cloud. Behind that cloud-shaped icon on our screens is a whole universe of technologies and cultural norms, all working to keep us from noticing their existence. In this book, Tung-Hui Hu examines the gap between the real and the virtual in our understanding of the cloud. Hu shows that the cloud grew out of such older networks as railroad tracks, sewer lines, and television circuits. He describes key moments in the prehistory of the cloud, from the game "Spacewar" as exemplar of time-sharing computers to Cold War bunkers that were later reused as data centers. Countering the popular perception of a new "cloudlike" political power that is dispersed and immaterial, Hu argues that the cloud grafts digital technologies onto older ways of exerting power over a population. But because we invest the cloud with cultural fantasies about security and participation, we fail to recognize its militarized origins and ideology. Moving between the materiality of the technology itself and its cultural rhetoric, Hu's account offers a set of new tools for rethinking the contemporary digital environment.

What Sound Does a Color Make

Author: Kathleen Forde
Publisher: Independent Curators
ISBN: 9780916365714
Format: PDF
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Explores the subject of synesthesia in contemporary electronic art, where sound and visual stimuli seemingly fuse together in immersive sensory environments. Connecting recent developments in digital audiovisual art to their predigital roots, this exhibition provokes a renewed awareness of human cognition and perception through a selection of compelling works by an international group of artists

Picturing Space Displacing Bodies

Author: Lyle Massey
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271029803
Format: PDF, ePub
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In Picturing Space, Displacing Bodies, Lyle Massey argues that we can only learn how and why certain kinds of spatial representation prevailed over others by carefully considering how Renaissance artists and theorists interpreted perspective. Combining detailed historical studies with broad theoretical and philosophical investigations, this book challenges basic assumptions about the way early modern artists and theorists represented their relationship to the visible world and how they understood these representations. By analyzing technical feats such as anamorphosis (the perspectival distortion of an object to make it viewable only from a certain angle), drawing machines, and printed diagrams, each chapter highlights the moments when perspective theorists failed to unite a singular, ideal viewpoint with the artist&’s or viewer&’s viewpoint or were unsuccessful at conjoining fictive and lived space.Showing how these &“failures&” were subsequently incorporated rather than rejected by perspective theorists, the book presents an important reassessment of the standard view of Renaissance perspective. While many scholars have maintained that perspective rationalized the relationships among optics, space, and painting, Picturing Space, Displacing Bodies asserts instead that Renaissance and early modern theorists often revealed a disjunction between geometrical ideals and practical applications. In some cases, they not only identified but also exploited these discrepancies. This discussion of perspective shows that the painter&’s geometry did not always conform to the explicitly rational, Cartesian formula that so many have assumed, nor did it historically unfold according to a standard account of scientific development.

Surface

Author: Giuliana Bruno
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022611483X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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What is the place of materiality—the expression or condition of physical substance—in our visual age of rapidly changing materials and media? How is it fashioned in the arts or manifested in virtual forms? In Surface, cultural critic and theorist Giuliana Bruno deftly explores these questions, seeking to understand materiality in the contemporary world. Arguing that materiality is not a question of the materials themselves but rather the substance of material relations, Bruno investigates the space of those relations, examining how they appear on the surface of different media—on film and video screens, in gallery installations, or on the skins of buildings and people. The object of visual studies, she contends, goes well beyond the image and engages the surface as a place of contact between people and art objects. As Bruno threads through these surface encounters, she unveils the fabrics of the visual—the textural qualities of works of art, whether manifested on canvas, wall, or screen. Illuminating the modern surface condition, she notes how façades are becoming virtual screens and the art of projection is reinvented on gallery walls. She traverses the light spaces of artists Robert Irwin, James Turrell, Tacita Dean, and Anthony McCall; touches on the textured surfaces of Isaac Julien’s and Wong Kar-wai’s filmic screens; and travels across the surface materiality in the architectural practices of Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Herzog & de Meuron to the art of Doris Salcedo and Rachel Whiteread, where the surface tension of media becomes concrete. In performing these critical operations on the surface, she articulates it as a site in which different forms of mediation, memory, and transformation can take place. Surveying object relations across art, architecture, fashion, design, film, and new media, Surface is a magisterial account of contemporary visual culture.