To Rise in Darkness

Author: Aldo A. Lauria-Santiago
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822381249
Format: PDF, Kindle
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To Rise in Darkness offers a new perspective on a defining moment in modern Central American history. In January 1932 thousands of indigenous and ladino (non-Indian) rural laborers, provoked by electoral fraud and the repression of strikes, rose up and took control of several municipalities in central and western El Salvador. Within days the military and civilian militias retook the towns and executed thousands of people, most of whom were indigenous. This event, known as la Matanza (the massacre), has received relatively little scholarly attention. In To Rise in Darkness, Jeffrey L. Gould and Aldo A. Lauria-Santiago investigate memories of the massacre and its long-term cultural and political consequences. Gould conducted more than two hundred interviews with survivors of la Matanza and their descendants. He and Lauria-Santiago combine individual accounts with documentary sources from archives in El Salvador, Guatemala, Washington, London, and Moscow. They describe the political, economic, and cultural landscape of El Salvador during the 1920s and early 1930s, and offer a detailed narrative of the uprising and massacre. The authors challenge the prevailing idea that the Communist organizers of the uprising and the rural Indians who participated in it were two distinct groups. Gould and Lauria-Santiago demonstrate that many Communist militants were themselves rural Indians, some of whom had been union activists on the coffee plantations for several years prior to the rebellion. Moreover, by meticulously documenting local variations in class relations, ethnic identity, and political commitment, the authors show that those groups considered “Indian” in western El Salvador were far from homogeneous. The united revolutionary movement of January 1932 emerged out of significant cultural difference and conflict.

To Rise in Darkness

Author: Jeffrey L. Gould
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822342281
Format: PDF, Docs
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An investigation of the January 1932 massacre of thousands of rural laborers in El Salvador and its long-term cultural and political consequences.

To rise in darkness

Author: Jeffrey L. Gould
Publisher: Duke Univ Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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The authors present a gripping history of the 1932 Communist led uprising in El Salvador and the violent repression that followed, one of the most consequential events in Latin American history. This text investigates memories of the massacre and its long term cultural and political consequences.

Children of Facundo

Author: Ariel de la Fuente
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822325963
Format: PDF, Mobi
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DIVCombines peasant studies and cultural history to revise the received wisdom on nineteenth-century Argentinian politics and aspects of the Argentinian state-formation process./div

Dignifying Argentina

Author: Eduardo Elena
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822977389
Format: PDF
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During their term, Juan and Eva Perón (1946–1955) led the region's largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh vantage by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. Elena argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society. Winner of the 2013 Book Prize in the Social Sciences awarded by the Southern Cone Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association.

Metropolitan Migrants

Author: Rubén Hernández-León
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520942462
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Challenging many common perceptions, this is the first book fully dedicated to understanding a major new phenomenon—the large numbers of skilled urban workers who are now coming across the border from Mexico's cities. Based on a ten-year, on-the-ground study of one working-class neighborhood in Monterrey, Mexico's industrial powerhouse and third-largest city, Metropolitan Migrants explores the ways in which Mexico's economic restructuring and the industrial modernization of the past three decades have pushed a new flow of migrants toward cities such as Houston, Texas, the global capital of the oil industry. Weaving together rich details of everyday life with a lucid analysis of Mexico's political economy, Rubén Hernández-León deftly traces the effects of restructuring on the lives of the working class, from the national level to the kitchen table.

Remembering a Massacre in El Salvador

Author: Héctor Lindo-Fuentes
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826336040
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Remembering a Massacre in El Salvador examines national and international historical memories of the events of 1932 and the factors that determined those memories. It also analyzes Miguel Marmol, by Roque Dalton, a well-known and influential narrative of the 1932 Matanza and one of the most important texts in modern Salvadoran history. The authors employ an array of primary evidence, including the personal archive of Roque Dalton - made available for the first time by the Dalton family - to argue that a systematic look at rivaling memories of the Matanza reveals the close association between historical narratives and political action. The book is complemented by a valuable appendix of primary documents that reveal the evolving memories of these important events in 1932."--BOOK JACKET.

A Century of Revolution

Author: Gilbert M. Joseph
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392852
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Latin America experienced an epochal cycle of revolutionary upheavals and insurgencies during the twentieth century, from the Mexican Revolution of 1910 through the mobilizations and terror in Central America, the Southern Cone, and the Andes during the 1970s and 1980s. In his introduction to A Century of Revolution, Greg Grandin argues that the dynamics of political violence and terror in Latin America are so recognizable in their enforcement of domination, their generation and maintenance of social exclusion, and their propulsion of historical change, that historians have tended to take them for granted, leaving unexamined important questions regarding their form and meaning. The essays in this groundbreaking collection take up these questions, providing a sociologically and historically nuanced view of the ideological hardening and accelerated polarization that marked Latin America’s twentieth century. Attentive to the interplay among overlapping local, regional, national, and international fields of power, the contributors focus on the dialectical relations between revolutionary and counterrevolutionary processes and their unfolding in the context of U.S. hemispheric and global hegemony. Through their fine-grained analyses of events in Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, they suggest a framework for interpreting the experiential nature of political violence while also analyzing its historical causes and consequences. In so doing, they set a new agenda for the study of revolutionary change and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. Contributors Michelle Chase Jeffrey L. Gould Greg Grandin Lillian Guerra Forrest Hylton Gilbert M. Joseph Friedrich Katz Thomas Miller Klubock Neil Larsen Arno J. Mayer Carlota McAllister Jocelyn Olcott Gerardo Rénique Corey Robin Peter Winn

To Die in this Way

Author: Jeffrey L. Gould
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822320982
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Ethnicity, national consciousness, and the growth of indigenous movements in Nicaragua.