Unthinking the Greek Polis

Author: Kostas Vlassopoulos
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139468464
Format: PDF, ePub
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This 2007 study explores how modern scholars came to write Greek history from a Eurocentric perspective and challenges orthodox readings of Greek history as part of the history of the West. Since the Greeks lacked a national state or a unified society, economy or culture, the polis has helped to create a homogenising national narrative. This book re-examines old polarities such as those between the Greek poleis and Eastern monarchies, or between the ancient consumer and the modern producer city, in order to show the fallacies of standard approaches. It argues for the relevance of Aristotle's concept of the polis, which is interpreted in an intriguing manner. Finally, it proposes an alternative way of looking at Greek history as part of a Mediterranean world-system. This interdisciplinary study engages with debates on globalisation, nationalism, Orientalism and history writing, while also debating developments in classical studies.

Greeks and Barbarians

Author: Kostas Vlassopoulos
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521764688
Format: PDF
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Examines the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period.

Politics

Author: Kostas Vlassopoulos
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199888701
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ancient Greece is famous as the civilization which "gave" the world democracy. Democracy has in modern times become the rallying cry of liberation from supposed totalitarianism and dictatorship. It is embedded in the assumptions of Western powers who proclaim their faith in the global spread of democratic governance and at the same time wielded by protesters in the developing world who challenge what they view as the West's cultural imperialism. Thus, a lively and well informed treatment of the nexus between politics in antiquity and political discourse in the modern era is both timely and apposite. As Kostas Vlassopoulos shows, much can be learned about the practice of politics from a comparative discussion of the classical and the contemporary. His starting point is that the value of looking back to a political system with different assumptions and elements can help us think, and even shape, what the future of modern politics might be. He discusses the contrasting political systems of Athens, Sparta and Rome; the political theories of thinkers like Plato, Aristotle and Cicero; how great events like the Peloponnesian War or the Roman civil wars shaped the course of political theory; and the discovery of freedom, participation and equality as political values in antiquity. Above all, the book shows how important and surprising an analysis of the ancient world can be in reassessing and revaluating modern political debates.

A History of the Classical Greek World 478 323 BC

Author: P. J. Rhodes
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631225652
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book gives an accessible account of classical Greek history, from the aftermath of the Persian Wars in 478 bc to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 bc. Covers political and military events, including: the flourishing of democracy in Athens; the Peloponnesian war, which involved the whole Greek world; and the conquests of Alexander the Great. Deals with social, economic and cultural developments as well as political and military events. Combines analysis with narrative. Details the evidence on which the account is based and the considerations which have to be born in mind in using this evidence. Written by P. J. Rhodes, who has been teaching and writing on Greek history for over 40 years. The book’s clarity and directness make it ideal for course use.

Communities and Networks in the Ancient Greek World

Author: Claire Taylor
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019872649X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This volume examines the diversity of networks and communities in the classical and early Hellenistic Greek world, with particular emphasis on those which took shape within and around Athens. In doing so it highlights not only the processes that created, modified, and dissolved thesecommunities, but shines a light on the interactions through which individuals with different statuses, identities, levels of wealth, and connectivity participated in ancient society. By drawing on two distinct conceptual approaches, that of network studies and that of community formation, Communities and Networks in the Ancient Greek World showcases a variety of approaches which fall under the umbrella of "network thinking" in order to move the study of ancient Greek historybeyond structuralist polarities and functionalist explanations. The aim is to reconceptualize the polis not simply as a citizen club, but as one inter-linked community amongst many. This allows subaltern groups to be seen not just as passive objects of exclusion and exploitation but activehistorical agents, emphasizes the processes of interaction as well as the institutions created through them, and reveals the interpenetration between public institutions and private networks which integrated different communities within the borders of a polis and connected them with the widerworld.

The Court and Court Society in Ancient Monarchies

Author: A. J. S. Spawforth
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139466631
Format: PDF
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Monarchy was widespread as a political system in the ancient world. This volume offers a substantial discussion of ancient monarchies from the viewpoint of the ruler's court. The monarchies treated are Achaemenid and Sassanian Persia, the empire of Alexander, Rome under both the early and later Caesars, the Han rulers of China and Egypt's Eighteenth Dynasty. A comparative approach is adopted to major aspects of ancient courts, including their organisation and physical setting, their role as a vehicle for display, and their place in monarchial structures of power and control. This approach is broadly inspired by work on courts in later periods of history, especially early-modern France. The case studies confirm that ancient monarchies created the conditions for the emergence of a court and court society. The culturally specific conditions in which these monarchies functioned meant variety in the character of the ruler's court from one society to another.

Greek Settlements in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea

Author: Gocha R. Tsetskhladze
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Eight papers, seven in English and one in German, from a seminar held at Cambridge University in 1996 on the subject of Greek colonisation and settlement in the East Mediterranean and the Pontus. Based on literary and archaeological evidence the contributors assess the social, political, economic and cultural interaction between the Greeks and the indigenous people. Contents: Greeks and Syria (J Boardman); Greek contact with the Levant and Mesopotamia (A Kuhrt); The Poleis of the southern Anatolia coast (A G Keen); Herodotus on the Black Sea coastline and Greek settlements (J Hind); Aspects of the Pontic and Eastern Mediterranean regions (Z H Archibald); Colonial origins in the Black Sea region (D Braund); Ionians abroad (G R Tsetskhladze); Archaische attische Keramik in Ionien

Early Modern Capitalism

Author: MAARTEN PRAK
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134604416
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This volume takes stock of recent research on economic growth, as well as the development of capital and labour markets, during the centuries that preceded the Industrial Revolution. The book underlines the diversity in the economic experiences of early modern Europeans and suggests how this variety might be the foundation of a new conception of economic and social change.

Theoretical Approaches to the Archaeology of Ancient Greece

Author: Lisa Nevett
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472122533
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the modern world, objects and buildings speak eloquently about their creators. Status, gender identity, and cultural affiliations are just a few characteristics we can often infer about such material culture. But can we make similar deductions about the inhabitants of the first millennium BCE Greek world? Theoretical Approaches to the Archaeology of Ancient Greece offers a series of case studies exploring how a theoretical approach to the archaeology of this area provides insight into aspects of ancient society. An introductory section exploring the emergence and growth of theoretical approaches is followed by examinations of the potential insights these approaches provide. The authors probe some of the meanings attached to ancient objects, townscapes, and cemeteries, for those who created, and used, or inhabited them. The range of contexts stretches from the early Greek communities during the eighth and seventh centuries BCE, through Athens between the eighth and fifth centuries BCE, and on into present day Turkey and the Levant during the third and second centuries BCE. The authors examine a range of practices, from the creation of individual items such as ceramic vessels and figurines, through to the construction of civic buildings, monuments, and cemeteries. At the same time they interrogate a range of spheres, from craft production, through civic and religious practices, to funerary ritual.

Ancient Greece

Author: Thomas R. Martin
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300190638
Format: PDF, Mobi
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DIVIn this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. Now in its second edition, this classic work now features new maps and illustrations, a new introduction, and updates throughout./divDIV /divDIV“A limpidly written, highly accessible, and comprehensive history of Greece and its civilizations from prehistory through the collapse of Alexander the Great’s empire. . . . A highly readable account of ancient Greece, particularly useful as an introductory or review text for the student or the general reader.�—Kirkus Reviews/divDIV /divDIV“A polished and informative work that will be useful for general readers and students.�—Daniel Tompkins, Temple University/divDIV/div