Yesterday Will Make You Cry

Author: Chester B. Himes
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393318296
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Originally published in 1952, this restored autobiographical novel about prison life is now presented in its entirety and captures the harsh realities, determination, and persistence of humanity in the prison world. Reprint. K. PW.

Chester B Himes A Biography

Author: Lawrence P. Jackson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393634132
Format: PDF
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The definitive biography of the groundbreaking African American author who had an extraordinary legacy on black writers globally. Chester B. Himes has been called “one of the towering figures of the black literary tradition” (Henry Louis Gates Jr.), “the best writer of mayhem yarns since Raymond Chandler” (San Francisco Chronicle), and “a quirky American genius” (Walter Mosely). He was the twentieth century’s most prolific black writer, captured the spirit of his times expertly, and left a distinctive mark on American literature. Yet today he stands largely forgotten. In this definitive biography of Chester B. Himes (1909–1984), Lawrence P. Jackson uses exclusive interviews and unrestricted access to Himes’s full archives to portray a controversial American writer whose novels unflinchingly confront sex, racism, and black identity. Himes brutally rendered racial politics in the best-selling novel If He Hollers Let Him Go, but he became famous for his Harlem detective series, including Cotton Comes to Harlem. A serious literary tastemaker in his day, Himes had friendships—sometimes uneasy—with such luminaries as Ralph Ellison, Carl Van Vechten, and Richard Wright. Jackson’s scholarship and astute commentary illuminates Himes’s improbable life—his middle-class origins, his eight years in prison, his painful odyssey as a black World War II–era artist, and his escape to Europe for success. More than ten years in the writing, Jackson’s biography restores the legacy of a fascinating maverick caught between his aspirations for commercial success and his disturbing, vivid portraits of the United States.

Subjectivity in the American Protest Novel

Author: K. Drake
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230118305
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the first major study of the twentieth-century American protest novel, Drake examines a group of authors who self-consciously exploited the revolutionary potential of the novel, transforming literary conventions concerning art and politics, readers and characters.

Pinktoes

Author: Chester B. Himes
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9780878058877
Format: PDF, ePub
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Mamie Mason, an influential Harlem society matron, hosts open sexual orgies in hopes of developing harmony between the races

Gettin Our Groove on

Author: Kermit Ernest Campbell
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814329252
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Looks at the African American vernacular tradition and how it is expressed in contemporary culture through hip-hop.

From the Plantation to the Prison

Author: Tara T. Green
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 9780881460902
Format: PDF
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"This book is an examination of the various forms that African-American imprisonment, as a social, historical, and political experience, has taken. Confinement describes the status of individuals who are placed within boundaries - either seen or unseen - but always felt. A word that suggests extensive implications, confinement describes the status of persons who are imprisoned and who are unjustly relegated to a social status that is hostile, rendering them powerless and subject to the rules of the authorities. Arguably, confinement appropriately describes the status of African Americans who have endured spaces of confinement, which include, but are not limited to plantations, Jim Crow societies, and prisons. At specific times, these "spaces of confinement" have been used to oppress African Americans socially, politically, and spiritually. Contributors examine the related experiences of Malcolm X, Bigger Thomas of Native Son, and Angela Davis."--BOOK JACKET.

Blind Man with a Pistol

Author: Chester Himes
Publisher: Vintage Crime/Black Lizard
ISBN: 9780307803283
Format: PDF, Docs
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At once grotesquely comic and unflinchingly violent, Blind Man With a Pistol is the final entry in Chester Himes's trailblazing Harlem Detectives series. New York is sweltering in the summer heat, and Harlem is close to the boiling point. To Coffin Ed Johnson and Grave Digger Jones, at times it seems as if the whole world has gone mad. Trying, as always, to keep some kind of peace—their legendary nickel-plated Colts very much in evidence—Coffin Ed and Grave Digger find themselves pursuing two completely different cases through a maze of knifings, beatings, and riots that threaten to tear Harlem apart. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The End of a Primitive

Author: Chester B. Himes
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393315400
Format: PDF, ePub
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Depicts a doomed sexual relationship between a tough, down-on-his-luck black writer and a white girl rapidly heading for a life of addiction.

Lonely Crusade

Author: Chester Himes
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 9781560251422
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A classic of African-American fiction, Chester Himes's tale of a young black man who becomes a union organizer during WWII examines major problems in American life: racism, anti-Semitism, labor strife, and corruption.

The Story of Cruel and Unusual

Author: Colin Dayan
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262260581
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The revelations of prisoner abuse and torture at Abu Ghraib and more recently at Guantánamo were shocking to most Americans. And those who condemned the treatment of prisoners abroad have focused on U.S. military procedures and abuses of executive powers in the war on terror, or, more specifically, on the now-famous White House legal counsel memos on the acceptable limits of torture. But in The Story of Cruel and Unusual, Colin Dayan argues that anyone who has followed U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding the Eighth Amendment prohibition of "cruel and unusual" punishment would recognize the prisoners' treatment at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo as a natural extension of the language of our courts and practices in U.S. prisons. In fact, it was no coincidence that White House legal counsel referred to a series of Supreme Court decisions in the 1980s and 1990s in making its case for torture.Dayan traces the roots of "acceptable" torture to slave codes of the nineteenth century that deeply embedded the dehumanization of the incarcerated in our legal system. Although the Eighth Amendment was interpreted generously during the prisoners' rights movement of the late 1960s and 1970s, this period of judicial concern was an anomaly. Over the last thirty years, Supreme Court decisions have once again dismantled Eighth Amendment protections and rendered such words as "cruel" and "inhuman" meaningless when applied to conditions of confinement and treatment during detention. Prisoners' actual pain and suffering have been explained away in a rhetorical haze--with rationalizations, for example, that measure cruelty not by the pain or suffering inflicted, but by the intent of the person who inflicted it.The Story of Cruel and Unusual is a stunningly original work of legal scholarship, and a searing indictment of the U.S. penal system.